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Torin

Heritage 130p unboxed to find the secondary mirror out of place

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Picked up my Heritage 130p today and brought home to unpack. Upon unpacking looks as if box has taken a knock somewhere along the line (enough to punch a small hole in the cardboard box). Scope looks okay externally but on closer examination the secondary mirror has turned on its support arm so it's out of alignment with the focuser.

Looking through the lens couldn't see a thing so I gently turned back the secondary mirror (via its support) until is was again in the middle and I then was able to see images through the lens. I managed to get a nice crisp image of a tree a hundred metres away so at that point felt better.

So... questions...

1. Should I be worried about the secondary mirror being twisted?

2. Should I just take it back and ask for a replacement...?

3. Is there anything else I should look for or do at this point?

All advice appreciated!

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Difficult to visualise the issue. Would a pic help

Barry

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Thanks for the replies - I've just had a go at my first ever collimation using a 35mm film canister (I knew I was keeping a couple for a reason!). Following the instructions in the manual - secondary mirror didn't need adjusting as I could see all the 'clips' (!!!!) and the primary mirror needed slight adjusting on one of the knobs to bring the secondary mirror into the centre. Sooo following that guide (please other Heritage 130p users comment!) I think its collimated. If that is it (which was pretty easy.... or did I do it right?) then am I ok?

Sadly can't check against a star as there's some atmospheric effect called 'cloud' in the way.... :( apparently this is a common, persistent phenomena when telescopes are purchased?

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well done Torin - you have shown the true spirit of a dob owner. if it's needs sorting - sort it. you will fit right in. depending where you are in N Derbyshire (I am in Stockport) I'd gladly take a look if you wanted an eye cast over it. just send me a PM

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well done Torin - you have shown the true spirit of a dob owner. if it's needs sorting - sort it. you will fit right in. depending where you are in N Derbyshire (I am in Stockport) I'd gladly take a look if you wanted an eye cast over it. just send me a PM

Thanks much appreciated!

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Sadly can't check against a star as there's some atmospheric effect called 'cloud' in the way.... :( apparently this is a common, persistent phenomena when telescopes are purchased?

It certainly has been the case since I bought mine. 2 nights out of 14 so far have been clear enough to use the scope :(

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Wow, you folks are lucky. Buy a scope & get 2 days out of 14 to try it out. I bought my scope in November, since then I have had 3 nights of decent skies, but the temps were minus 17-25 C. Ever since people started talking about the PannStars comet, being best seen from Western Canada, I haven't had a clear sky since mid Feb. I'm Jinxed, I tell ya.

Living on the east side of the Rockies has it's drawbacks. Can someone please buy a really big Dob in the U.K. so this cloudy weather can find a new home. I haven't seen a star in months!

Cheers!

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Hi Torin.

I have the Heritage 130p as well and it's very easy to collimate, I use the 35mm film can method as well and it works a treat.

From what you described it sounds as if you have done it right, It's a great scope so enjoy the views once the clouds clear :smiley:

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I saw the best skies ever from saskachewan 5 years ago. You Get great dark skies the mate. Try the tomatoe soup we have to look through!

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Well so far not been able to test it much as the skies have been full of snow, not stars... thankfully the people who I've bought it from are giving me a couple of weeks and will still replace it if I still think there is an issue.

Here's hoping for at least some gaps in the cloud soon!

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Well first light tonight - grabbed 10 mins between large banks for cloud. Went for the brightest thing I could see which I believe was Jupiter. Struggling with the Red Dot finder - won't go low enough but read about that somewhere else on here so I'll have a look to see what the solution others might have found.

I've only got the standard 25mm and 10mm lenses.

The 25mm seemed to give a nice bright crisp dot and I think I could detect the hint of moon either side of the planet (can anyone confirm this... or am I mixing up faint stars in the same region of space...?) oh and saw what suspect was a satellite fly past really quickly.

With the 10mm got a dot maybe 2mm across in the eyepiece (is this what I should be seeing?) and I could just after a few moments start to make out bands of colour? Also what I believe were the moons also seemed to stand out more.

So on first light I think I'm pleased...

Lessons learned -

1. Need something to stand the scope on, chair... table... something to give my knees a break and to give me a stable platforms (suggestions welcome)

2. Need to not to expect hubble images or for planetary bodies to be as big as the moon in the eyepiece (hoping 2xBarlow and maybe a 5mm lens might go some way?)

3. It was -2C out there, I was warm except for feet, so need to wrap them up a little more and perhaps not stand on snow...

4. Realised that I'm going to start hating my neighbors existence - well certainly their security lighting and those that don't shut their curtains!

Otherwise I think the scope might be okay after all... more testing needed though! Wanted to check the collimation but by the time I had a quick look the clouds rolled in and I didn't have time to defocus .

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I completley feel your pain with the neighbours, lights and curtains.

Don't fall in to the trap of thinking 'more magnification = better' its possible to over magnify something. I find I enjoy Jupiter the best with my 25mm and a Barlow. Instead of expecting Hubble images, take pride in the fact that you can atleast see it and make out the clouds. If you can focus it right Jupiter is a great sight even when small in the EP.

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I completley feel your pain with the neighbours, lights and curtains.

Don't fall in to the trap of thinking 'more magnification = better' its possible to over magnify something. I find I enjoy Jupiter the best with my 25mm and a Barlow. Instead of expecting Hubble images, take pride in the fact that you can atleast see it and make out the clouds. If you can focus it right Jupiter is a great sight even when small in the EP.

Ah good point - forgot about a Barlow - I assume you mean a 2x barlow?

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Yeah, I only have the standard 2 x Barlow that came with my Scope but it does the job nicely.

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Yeah, I only have the standard 2 x Barlow that came with my Scope but it does the job nicely.

Skywatcher Barlow?

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Hi Torin, this is the table I made for my Heritage 130p, it makes viewing so much easier.

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I like to sit on the ground on a soft camping matress with my Heritage 130P if I'm watching something low on the horizon, otherwise I put it on a table. But an high adjustable stool chair would probably be a good idea!

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Would also advise against going for massive magnification, the viewing won't be very crisp (at least in my experience) and it will also require more effort to track the objects you are looking at, rather than letting you concentrate on focusing on the details of whatever you are observing. :)

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(can anyone confirm this... or am I mixing up faint stars in the same region of space...?) oh and saw what suspect was a satellite fly past really quickly.

....

With the 10mm got a dot maybe 2mm across in the eyepiece (is this what I should be seeing?)

Yup, they were probably the moons - it doesn't seem to take a lot to see them (maybe not surprising given their size!) There are tools that will show their positions for the day - if you've an iPhone, there's one called JupitersMoons which seems good.

And with the 10mm in my scope, yes, Jupiter looks like a 2mm circle. You can see it's not a point, but otherwise it looks pretty bright and start like. 10mm still only gives you x65, and from what I've read people suggest x120 to x150, or even x180.

I found that a 5mm lens - so x130 - gives nice views. Jupiter still isn't huge, but you can see bands (3 easily, and I think I've caught a hint of a 4th), shadows of transits, etc.. I've not spotted the GRS, but somehow it's always on the far side of the planet in the times I've looked. Try x130 - I think you'll be pleased. I agree with what Amra says though - higher magnification would lose resolution, and it would zoom across the eyepiece

Re: Red Dot Finder - I found moving my forward (I think) on the mounting thing brought it down slightly.

As for observing position - I take a chair and sit next to the scope, though I think a table is necessary if trying to look at things near zenith, or really near the horizon. Either, you can't see through the RDF, or things like grass, fences, trees gets in the way too much!

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If there is no physical damage to the scope or mirrors, then there is nothing to worry about. When my Heritage arrived, the secondary spider vane was not screwed in tightly and the mirror was off because of this. I simply turned the vane until it was tight and the secondary was centred. A quick colimation of your scope will fix any issues you may have or think you have with the secondary.

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Hi Torin, this is the table I made for my Heritage 130p, it makes viewing so much easier.

Forget the stand - (I am impressed but sadly it is beyond my skills...) I like do the heater though!

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