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shaun01

New to astronomy

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Hello everyone i'm new to star gazing I have a pair of binoculars but when im looking up at the stars I don't know what I am looking at as they all look the same to me can anyone help me please as it is starting to get a bit frustrating and I really do enjoy looking up at them but it would be better if I only knew what I was looking at please can anybody help me

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Hi Shaun, there are plenty of star guides you can buy, you can also get a planispere off amazon for about £6 that will help you. There are plenty of apps that are free for your smartphone or tablet. If funds are short you can look on you tube and just google " night sky using binoculars" hope this will get you up and running , kev

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Hi, shaun01, and welcome to SGL! I would recommend downloading 'Stellarium' - a free planetarium that can easily be configured for your own location and will show what is in the night sky at any given time. As Khw said, a planisphere is another simple guide - usually a laminated card. By setting the date and time this will show the main constellations and will help you find your way around.

There is a dedicated section for binocular users on this site, and I am sure if you posted there you would get plenty of help from more experienced users.

Martin

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Hello & welcome :laugh: Great name you have there :grin:

Shaun

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Hi Shaun welcome to the lounge, Stellarium is very good, it has helped me, I too am a newbie with bins and this site is

superb if you need help, I subscribe to Sky at Night magazine you learn a lot and every month there is a guide to help

at what is visible in the night sky, but remember there is a lot to learn, but it's fun.

Good luck

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Hi Shaun. As others have said, Stellarium is great. Also a book like "Turn Left at Orion" is a great idea to consider.

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Hi Shaun and welcome to the forum. Agree with the suggestions above regarding Stellarium and Turn Left at Orion. In addition to our own binocular section, you might want to take a look at a website called, "The Binocular Sky" which is updated regularly by a member of this forum and his monthly target suggestions will get you off to a good start for sure.

Clear skies and enjoy the forum,

James

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hi there :) Welcome to this fab forum.

As a newbie I would recommend just picking one or two things to explore at a time, such as working out which constellation you are looking at, and then looking at the stars individually with the bins so you can see the secrets the naked eye doesnt show that well (well, sometimes!) and then once you can point out that constellation without looking it up you can start star-hopping to find other stuff, by using programs like stellarium for planet spotting etc.

This time of year its probably best to recognise Cassiopia and Taurus, then find M45 and go WOW

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Hi Shaun welcome to SGL, i had to use my bins to read your post :grin: , eyes aint what they used to be,

Stellarium is the way to go if you want to learn the night sky. :kiss:

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I'm also pretty new and learning the night sky, as other have said i'ver found stellarium to be very useful in learning, but i actually found it difficult to translate that into real world when looking outside (its just me) I have a skyscout which has helped me the most. You will get it and the targets will start screaming at you, learn some basic like Orion stand out like sore thumb to me, if you can find a familiar object each night you'll grow from there. Plaeides is also another good one to lean, stands out and looks ace in bins.

Good luck have fun and this group is a wealth of knowledge dont be afraid to ask away :)

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Hi and welcome aboard - follow the advice above and those constellations will be tripping off the tongue in no time!

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Welcome to SGL

I'd second the recommendations -- planisphere, Stellarium and Turn Left at Orion.

James

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Hello and welcome from me too :smiley: Miranda had a really good point - start with one constellation and get to know it really well, then move on to the next one. In no time you'll be able to find your way around easily :smiley: If you read one of the monthly astronomy magazines, they always have a star chart which you can use to navigate your way around, with targets for the month.

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