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How do you observe Jupiter with an equatorial tripod?


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Hello,

What sort of finder scope are you using? Have you aligned it?

Point the telescope using the finderscope, at Jupiter. Lock both clutches and use the 20mm eyepiece and focus. Jupiter will be quite small but obvious. You can then centre it and exchange the 20mm for the 10mm for a closer look.

Dan

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Ditto the above. If you haven't aligned the finder scope to the telescope, then you can do that during the day time by focusing the main scope on a distant object (tree, pylon, window etc but it needs to be some distance away, 1/2 a mile or more) and then adjust the finder scope to show the same object in the centre of the of the finder.

Edited by sologuitarist61
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Fair enough well with the 20mm in, no matter how good your finder scope is you should be able to have Jupiter in the field of view (if its aligned).

Dont worry about accurate polar alignment for visual, just check that the polar axis is roughly pointing north.

Unlock both clutches, point it at Jupiter, lock them in. Then only using the 20mm eyepiece focus, (rack the focuser right out and in, sometimes it needs a very big adjustment)

Are you just not seeing anything? Have you seen any stars or anything?

Dan

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I aligned my finderscope during the day on an object a couple of miles away. All was good. When I went to use the scope at night it was miles out! Must have knocked it during setting up some how without noticing. Had to resort to lying on the ground looking up through the scope to find jupiter as it was so high in the sky. Not ideal! I then zeroed in the finderscope and all was well after that. I now have a Telrad fitted and it is much easier.

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I have the same scope as you kingjoshtheposh and also spent what seemed like months trying to find Jupiter! The finder is absolutely appalling so I ignore it totally. I'm going to buy a Rigel Quikfinder soon as I've been reliably informed that it will actually help you find things! In the end I found Jupiter (& the moon) by accident by loosening the RA and Dec locking nuts and basically waving the whole scope around until something bright came into view! Not very technical but it did the job! Found Jupiter again this evening but for some reason couldn't focus properly. The last time it was a really clear view through the 10mm and I even saw 3 of its moons. Not sure if tonight was just a hazy sky although it looked clear enough. I hope its not my collimation as the thought of messing with that is really quite terrifying! Good luck!

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Line the finder at a lamp post a good way off. More than a few hundread meters would be good. Center the bulb in the middle of your eye piece. Look through the finder and adjust it til the bulb is centered. I say adjust; my finder has 3 screws that can be turned to center the image. I just wiggle the thing with my hand to align it, to be honest. (Cheap scope..I guess the big guys don't do this!!!)

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Is it the Astromaster scope with the built-in red dot finder, or an older 114eq with a magnifying finder? Mine has the magnifying finder, it was basically unalignable because it's too loose a fit in the bracket so I put some tape round the finder barrel to make it a snug fit, now I can align it but it still gets knocked out very easily.

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