Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

paul schofield

Hope Brian Cox is wrong.

Recommended Posts

I just saw Brian Cox on this morning. Phill and Holly asked if the asteroid due to pass close to us on the 14th or 15th Feb will be visible to the naked eye. To which his response was no, hope he is wrong, I was looking forward to that, having heard others say it may be close enough to be heard, I thought this may be asking a bit much, but I would be happy seeing it. Hope he is wrong. Fingers crossed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find a lot of contradicting stories on this, one says it will be one of the best visual asteroids and others, like Brian Cox on this morning says it won't be visual to the naked eye.

Maybe because no one actyally knows yet?

Rob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

having heard others say it may be close enough to be heard

Hi Paul

You'd never hear an asteroid (or anything else for that matter) past by Earth above the atmosphere as space does not propagate sound (space is a vacuum).

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if we are able to see it – cloud come to mind, and yes I have a half empty glass :sad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's predicted to peak at around 7th magnitude, so will not be visible to the naked eye, though should be easy in binoculars.

It fades rapidly through the evening, and starts at low altitude. These are details for the south of England (from the BAA)

2013, Friday 15th February

Time Altitude Direction Mag. Motion

19:51 UT 0° E 7.6 44"/sec = 44 deg/hr due north

(this is 26 minutes after closest approach)

20:08 UT 10° E 7.7 41"/sec

20:24 UT 20° ENE 8.0 35"/sec

20:45 UT 30° ENE 8.3 28 "/sec

21:13 UT 40° NE 8.9 20 "/sec

21:58 UT 50° NE 9.7 12 "/sec

Should be possible to see it moving, and if you manage to catch it early you should be able to follow it for the evening. Will be trickier the later you start.

Callum

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul

You'd never hear an asteroid (or anything else for that matter) past by Earth above the atmosphere as space does not propagate sound (space is a vacuum).

Ha that's a point Cath, Note to self, think what you write before putting it on here. I blame the devastation of the bad news. Clear skies all..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like Brian Cox was correct then - it won't be visible to the naked eye. Even thought it's supposed to be half the size of a football pitch the albedo of these things is often very low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coxy be wrong? Surely not. If it's not like he says then there must be a fault with reality. :D

James

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul

You'd never hear an asteroid (or anything else for that matter) past by Earth above the atmosphere as space does not propagate sound (space is a vacuum).

If it did pass a bit closer and enter the atmosphere, I think we might hear something then, not to mention see it. But that would probably be a bit close for comfort!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Details issued by the BAA

Thanks for that - an interesting read!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd never hear an asteroid (or anything else for that matter) past by Earth above the atmosphere as space does not propagate sound (space is a vacuum).

Excuse me Cath but, "space does not propogate sound"? I think you may be mistaken there. Maybe you're too young to have seen this first time round, but

.

Oh, and..... Yes. In space everybody can hear you scream! :shocked:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excuse me Cath but, "space does not propogate sound"? I think you may be mistaken there. Maybe you're too young to have seen this first time round, but

.

Oh, and..... Yes. In space everybody can hear you scream! :shocked:

That made me laugh, from the thumbnail of the video in the post I was expecting a really technical answer from Tomorrows World or something on why we would hear from space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excuse me Cath but, "space does not propogate sound"? I think you may be mistaken there. Maybe you're too young to have seen this first time round, but

.

Oh, and..... Yes. In space everybody can hear you scream! :shocked:

Sorry, I wasn't thinking lol. Movie producers know better ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a thought but Brian Cox by profession is neither a professional astronomer or astro physicist. He is in fact from a quantum physics background, nuclear physics to be precise. So although i have no doubt he is still well versed in astro related matters and well advised before interviews etc this is technically not his field. I guess his ever present smile, enthusiasm and floppy student hair made him an ideal frontman to express the current theories in the field which the majority of the public see as technically difficult to take in and somewhat dull.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a thought but Brian Cox by profession is neither a professional astronomer or astro physicist. He is in fact from a quantum physics background, nuclear physics to be precise. So although i have no doubt he is still well versed in astro related matters and well advised before interviews etc this is technically not his field. I guess his ever present smile, enthusiasm and floppy student hair made him an ideal frontman to express the current theories in the field which the majority of the public see as technically difficult to take in and somewhat dull.

Actually particle physics to be precise! :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets Hope it isnt too close - id rather not see it if the alternative is to swallow it :grin:

I prefer the comfort of needing a scope

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.. silly question?....Will it be visible from the northern hemisphere?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excuse me Cath but, "space does not propogate sound"? I think you may be mistaken there. Maybe you're too young to have seen this first time round, but

.

Oh, and..... Yes. In space everybody can hear you scream! :shocked:

Next you'll be telling me Wookies don't exist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wookies do exist and whats more never go near one when you have cash on you. From what i hear people are always losing money at the Wookies!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.. silly question?....Will it be visible from the northern hemisphere?

Yes - see the attachment to the post in this thread by studdedsole:

http://stargazerslou...g/#entry1808509

You will need binoculars or a scope though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.