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focaldepth

Does anyone know of free astronomy resources for schools?

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Hi All,

My GF is the head at a primary school in Lancashire. The school runs various after school clubs/events, such as the MAKE IT club. Some pupils and teachers have expressed an interest in an Astronomy club.

The question is are there any resources/grants etc. available for primary schools to call on in the Lancashire area.

She is interested in ideas and resources to support this club. Obviously I have offered myself but I think she is looking for something a bit more formal than a bloke with a scope or 2.

Any suggestions welcome.

Thanks in advance...

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Send a message to a member called soupy. I believe he runs an astronomy class at a local school so may be able to help.

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Thank you everyone, I have passed on the suggestions. Now the next problem is the Clxxxx. [Removed as that joke is getting very tired by now.]

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