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nephilim

Skywatcher Quattro f/4 imaging Newtonian

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There may be more to sort out on a Quattro than the collimation, viz Singlin's post on the history of his own Quattro. However, he has sorted it. If you are already keen on Newts then why not give it a go? There are lots of arguments in favour. The reason I don't do it is that I need things to be plug and play, since I'm a provider, and I don't have the time to be tuning optics before getting started. The start of the evening can be pretty hectic as it is.

Olly

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if you decided on the quattro do yourself a favor and get the carbon version ive had the steel and yes it does flex

Edited by Daniel-K

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if you decided on the quattro do yourself a favor and get the carbon version ive had the steel and yes it does flex

What sort of weight are you putting on it?

I'm about a third of the way through Steve's book (arrived today) so far one or two new tips and lots of reassurance that I don't have the wrong kit (other than the 300PDS but I knew that)

I'm currently planning on using a DSLR, as I'm not sure if I can justify the cost of a heavy CCD while I have a perfectly serviceable EOS. As per Steve's book power will be at a premium on my dark sites so I'm currenty thinking Syncguider, DSLR (I have several batteries for the EOS) and I will probably build a a heater for the secondary when blacking / flocking the interior. Although I do see the long term value in going CF it's 200 quid extra, which bites the guider budget, again there is an argument about spending time getting to know the Quattro and ironing out any kinks in it before adding the complication of a guide scope, should be worth a few weeks or months (depending on weather) doing that as it is.

I'd be interested to know what sort of cameras and other kit people are loading on the focusers.

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if you decided on the quattro do yourself a favor and get the carbon version ive had the steel and yes it does flex

Alternatively by a cheap steel tube F4 and mod it yourself with a DIY strengthening plate!!

Dscf7166_1024_zpsde17525b.jpg

Dscf7187_1024_zps6d21b7ee.jpg

Edited by laser_jock99

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The carbon is also about low expansion to retain focus. But it retains the heat more. Decisions decisions!!

My optical expert friend insists that fans should blow across the mirror, not up or down the tube. Nobody seems to do this bar a few renegade private owners but they all insist that it works.

Olly

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Alternatively by a cheap steel tube F4 and mod it yourself with a DIY strengthening plate!!

http://stargazerslou...diy-super-newt/

no offence jock but i would not be happy having to do that to a scope i had just bought to "make it work" effectively looks like you done a cracking job though

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no offence jock but i would not be happy having to do that to a scope i had just bought to "make it work" effectively looks like you done a cracking job though

It's all good fun- I still have the 12" F4 to do this mod on yet. If you want a scope that works straight out of the box, then other than small refractors there probably isn't anything. Just expect the 'tweaks' to be more extreme at the budget end! Optically these are the same as some "high end" scopes though. If you can fork out for the ASA Keller 2Korr coma corrector reducer then that can make for a very interesting scope indeed.

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I'd have to agree with Daniel-K if I'm going to have to plate a telescope in this way the only logical conclusion I could come to is that it's not fit for purpose! I have had some feedback from a Quattro owner with an EOS 650D that hasn't noticed any flex or is it the ATIK you have noticed this with?

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I'd have to agree with Daniel-K if I'm going to have to plate a telescope in this way the only logical conclusion I could come to is that it's not fit for purpose!

These scopes work - but anything can be improved, almost with no effort, like the six spring mirror mod.

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Laser Jock, I heartily agree that there are mods than be done, I can't leave my 12" alone and the next mod will probably be springs (btw do you know where to get them?) But I think some mods are going too far, if I am getting flex in the tube I have to seriously question the capability of the focuser and so on......... Pretty soon I end up with something that I've changed everything on and wondering why I didn't put an order into Orion in the first place...................actually I can probably answer that............because I'd end up modding that as well! I've spotted a Celestron C8 (with farstar) needing some TLC locally, which where I started this investigation! I may take a look at it as an option, but I still don't think going f10 / f6.3 will make me happy for anything other than Lunar / Planetary work. I am rapidly coming to the conclusion that the best option is "Do nothing and stick to visual"

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The only thing with going visual is you miss the stress of AP :)

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The only thing with going visual is you miss the stress of AP :)

So far I have found AP rewarding, although in many ways I am asking too much of my mount by sticking a camera on it, it does enhance many of my favourite visual targets. I will ponder a while longer and make up my own mind, in the mean time I will check out the C8 that is for sale in a local pawn brokers and ensure the dent to the rear of the tube has not unseated the mirror, I understand the mount is trollied but I'm not interested in it. I must admit a light visual scope does appeal even if get's me no further from an AP perspective.

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I think we are heading to the conclusion here that you need three, maybe four scopes to cover all eventualities. You don't often see a fisherman who has only one rod or a photographer with just a single lens in his bag? So it is with scopes. The basic scope 'collection' might consist of an 80mm apo refractor for widefield, a fast Newt for galaxies & faint nebulae plus an SCT for planetary/lunar....

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Three or four is barely getting warmed up :D

James

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I can see the sense of a minimum of two, one loaded with AP equipment off taking images of something and a nice visual scope for doing some stargazing while you're outside stargazing! Since the AP setup would probably include a refractor as main or guide scope that's the 3!

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Heh heh. When the imaging kit works for long enough for you to get away from the computer screen and recover your adaptation then having a nice visual scope in the vicintiy is great. But ...ah... don't bank on the imaging kit working unattended for more than three seconds on a bad night!!! :grin:

Olly

http://ollypenrice.smugmug.com/Other/Best-of-Les-Granges/22435624_WLMPTM#!i=2277139556&k=FGgG233

Edited by ollypenrice
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But ...ah... don't bank on the imaging kit working unattended for more than three seconds on a bad night!!! :grin:

Olly

http://ollypenrice.s...39556&k=FGgG233

I'm setting up a second pier for widefield imaging work shortly. The plan being to use the second rig in the 'spare time' when the main scope is up and running. But as you say with the potential for things going wrong on both rigs the reality will be more like a plate balancing act!

Edited by laser_jock99
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yup nothing worse when its crystal clear and your kit just wont do as its told :p wouldn't have it any other way

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OK Bad idea, I won't bore you all with the details but after several failed / poor deliveries the Quattro 8" has gone and good riddance to it. Never got to first light as I personally lack the type of strength needed to move the unlocked focuser or the built in zoom in my Mk1 eyeball to compensate for the almost total lack of movement with the tension screws slacked off barely 1/16th of a turn (even with WD40), if you have one of these and have managed to get the focuser to work good luck to you. I will say however in the fiasco that was my scope delivery I did receive (briefly) a 10" Quattro, much better beastie than it's weedier brother but unfortunately out of my modest budget. I'd almost save up for one but most UK dealers seem to deliver direct from OVL who also don't seem to check, you basically have only the factory QA to rely on, not a good bet from my bitter experience

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Hi,

Sorry to hear that you had problems with your 8" Quattro. I have the carbon version and the focuser, whilst short on travel works very well. Mine is really well made and gives great results, so I think you have been very unlucky.

When I bought a 10" Flextube I had to get three, the first two arrived with a dent in the side due to insufficient packing and the heavy handed delivery. I think the best way is to pick the scope up from the shop, that way they get delivered in bulk and less likely to have problems.

Robin

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Im going to stick my nose in here :)

Personally speaking I had the best sucsess with refractors, a newt out of the box needs way to much tinkering than its worth imo.

2 scopes come to mind that worked well for me. Revelation 100ED, and Takasashi Baby Q. The SW ED80 is OK,(with reducer) but when you start hanging Cameras and filter wheels of the end of it the weakness on the stock focuser becomes an issue... Now if your only going to use a DSLR dont worry at all with the 80ED... however.

One thing that is easy to get drawn into is the constant upgrade cycle, to get better kit to make it all better, this will end up eating a wallet and spitting it back out with total disregard to the owner ;)

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Last year I was fortunate to be able to go to Astrofest in London. I'd decided to closely inspect all the imaging Newts I could. Only the Orion ( Crewe ) came close. All the others looked like a disaster waiting to happen one dark, cold and miserable night.

The lesson I took from the trip was.... Build your own and expect it to be expensive.

Dave.

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These cheap fast Newts should be sold as kits because that's all they are. Cheap and fast go together like cheap and Ferrari. That is... they don't.

Olly

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Fast

Cheap

Works perfectly, straight out of the box.

Pick any two out of three. Fast and cheap wont work straight out of the box. Cheap and works straight out of the box won't be fast. Fast and works straight outta the box won't be cheap.

There's a reason why Orion Optics AGs cost >£3k.

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