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This is a very wide angle image of the Night Sky looking east toward Norwich (hence the orange glow)

post-17906-0-12230000-1354378658_thumb.j

Unfortunately i forgot to take it in RAW so there is a bit of noise evident

I used the wide end of a Sigma 10-20mm EX lens on a Canon EOS 60D

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I'm liking it. The colors are wonderful.

I plan on maybe going out for something similar tonight if the weather is clear. Going ot have Jupiter, the Moon and Orion ni the same fild of view with my 18-55mm.

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Cheers all ^_^

I'm liking it. The colors are wonderful.

I plan on maybe going out for something similar tonight if the weather is clear. Going ot have Jupiter, the Moon and Orion ni the same fild of view with my 18-55mm.

There's a lot in that area of sky, loads of interest :)

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This is really nice, It almost looks like the sunrising. Great composition and location

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