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Pub quiz anger

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Their are poles on the moon?

Daughter "Daddy how far can you see from sea level on a clear day"

Dad "About 15 miles"

Daughter " Daddy how far away is the Sun"

Dad Slap

Reminds me of when I was young - "Don't keep asking questions!" was the usual reply I got ;)

Edited by Cath

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Well here is a definition as per an online Astronomical dictionary..

Space.About.Com

Definition: star: A ball of mostly hydrogen and helium gas that shines extremely brightly. Our Sun is a star. A star is so massive that its core is extremely dense and hot. At the high core temperatures of a star' date=' atoms move so fast that they sometimes stick to other atoms when they collide with them, forming more massive atoms and releasing a great amount of energy. This process is known as nuclear fusion. Star.

[/quote']

And Infoplease.com has this far better definition..

Star:a celestial object consisting of intensely hot gases held together by gravity. Stars derive their energy from nuclear reactions going on in their interiors' date=' generating heat and light. Stars are very large. Our Sun has a diameter of 865,400 mi—a comparatively small star.

A dwarf star is a small star that is of relatively low mass and average or below-average luminosity. The Sun is a yellow dwarf, which is in its main sequence, or prime of life. This means that nuclear reactions of hydrogen maintain its size and temperature. By contrast, a white dwarf is a star at the end of its life, with low luminosity, small size, and very high density.

A red giant is a star nearing the end of its life. When a star begins to lose hydrogen and burn helium instead, it gradually collapses, and its outer region begins to expand and cool. The light we see from these stars is red because of their cooler temperature. There are also red super giants, which are even more massive.

A brown dwarf lacks the mass to generate nuclear fusion like a true star, but it is also too massive and hot to be a planet. A brown dwarf usually cools into a dark, practically invisible object. The existence of brown dwarfs, also called failed stars, was confirmed in Nov. 1995 when astronomers at Palomar Observatory in California took the first photograph of this mysterious object.

It's clear that definitions specifically mention The Sun as a star...so the quiz master was WRONG..regardless of what ever definitions others can produce.

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I just posed this question to my teenage daughter (who think Science is for total nerds). She unhesitatingly answered "the Sun". This was swiftly followd by a phone call from Mother in Law, who believes that Venus is the ISS by the way, and much to my surprise she too answered "the Sun". Something wrong with Science education where you live, I think.

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Aaaagh, the inadequately researched pub quiz.

Just like two other questions I have suffered - "what's the smallest planet?" or "what is the outer-most planet?"

"Well that depends on when your Junior Encyclopedia of Space was published!" is the only correct answer.

Grrrrrr! :grin:

Edited by Double Kick Drum

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This ones gonna rumble ;)

Absolutely, this is a good thread, especially when someone accuses others of being pedantic. Keep it coming!

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where's that emoticon for eating popcorn?

i love how everyone always "blames the schools". 'cos, yeah, it's everyone else's fault. god forbid someone could take responsibility for their own a stupidity.

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I reckon you're all being a bunch of patronising pedants. Might I draw your attention to the Collins dictionary definition of star as "any of a vast number of celestial objects that are visible in the clear night sky as points of light" and MacMillan has "a very large hot ball of gas that appears as a small bright light in the sky at night". So the quiz master was just going with the common definition of a star qua star.

Collins also defines the Sun as "the star at the centre of our solar system". Macmillan, defines the Sun as.."the star in the sky that provides light and warmth to the Earth" If the question was posed exactly as per the first post then surely there can only be one possible answer.

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where's that emoticon for eating popcorn?

i love how everyone always "blames the schools". 'cos, yeah, it's everyone else's fault. god forbid someone could take responsibility for their own a stupidity.

You're not a teacher, are you?

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we had a quiz question the other week-whats the minimum amount of shots for a full clearence at snooker.the quizmaster said 37 shots.i said 36 and apparently im wrong because he meant you didnt pot a ball on the break!!!!i then became pedantic and said three wasnt a definative answer because you could pot 2 reds at a time then followed up that the theoretical minimum was actually 8 if you potted all 15 reds off the break then a colour followed by the 6 colours.we lost by one point because he wouldnt give me the point for 36!!

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Schoolteacher to my grandson: "What is the biggest star?"

Grandson: "R165a! Or the Pistol Star! Eta Carina is big too!" I taught him good.

Teacher shakes her head sadly. "No Ashley. The sun is the biggest star."

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Schoolteacher to my grandson: "What is the biggest star?"

Grandson: "R165a! Or the Pistol Star! Eta Carina is big too!" I taught him good.

Teacher shakes her head sadly. "No Ashley. The sun is the biggest star."

Please tell me this isn't true (the anecdote, not the fact)...

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The Sun is in fact the nearest star to Earth.

I just looked it up in Wikipedia so it must be true.

However, there is a link from Wikipedia to Wiktionary, which says that a star is any small dot appearing in the cloudless portion of the sky.

For the sake of clarity on the word 'dot', Wiktionary helpfully defines it as the diminutive of the female given name Dorothy.

Sorted ;)

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Yay good old wiki facts . This threads livening up a tedious night shift :)

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For those of you that have trouble sleeping , look up wikipeadia's definition of a definition ;)

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I thought the whole point of pub quizing was to be more pedantic than the other teams!!!!! :grin: :grin:

I still remember the time when a questionmaster insisted that the Glouster Meteor was "Britain's first supersonic jet fighter"............ :shocked:

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I thought the whole point of pub quizing was to be more pedantic than the other teams!!!!! :grin: :grin:

I still remember the time when a questionmaster insisted that the Glouster Meteor was "Britain's first supersonic jet fighter"............ :shocked:

It could go supersonic! Just rip the wings off and add some serious rocketry! Oh, and don't mind it disintegrating as you pass Mach 1

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our sun cannot be a star as stars can only be seen at night :huh:

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oh yer and whats pedantic meen i never was lingwistick spose il av 2 wiki it

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oh yer and whats pedantic meen i never was lingwistick spose il av 2 wiki it

I'm not sure Wikipedia and Pendantism are synonymous with each other.

The national society of pedants, of which I'm proud to say I'm a fully paid up member of, demand accuracy - a fact sorely lost on many Wikipedia contributors.

Typed by me on my fone, using fumms... Excuse eny speling errurs.

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And the bonds from radio shows as well :-)

Typed by me on my fone, using fumms... Excuse eny speling errurs.

Ah, Bob Holness, In 1956 he played 'Agent 007' in a radio production of Moonraker

Btw, On my, Dark side of the moon, the quote was " there's no dark side of the moon, really. Matter of fact, it's all dark" :grin:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=328WhjAXpcs

Enjoy

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I'm not sure Wikipedia and Pendantism are synonymous with each other.

The national society of pedants, of which I'm proud to say I'm a fully paid up member of, demand accuracy - a fact sorely lost on many Wikipedia contributors.

Typed by me on my fone, using fumms... Excuse eny speling errurs.

thank you for the explanation i think :huh:

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