Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_2.thumb.jpg.72789c04780d7659f5b63ea05534a956.jpg

Jessop 800-80 Astronomical Telescope - Questions


Recommended Posts

Well, I'm a complete newbie and just have a few questions about my telescope. Firstly, how far should I be able to see with it, like should I be able to see deep space objects or just stuff inside the solar system? Also, is it possible to attach an equatorial mount to it and if so, where can I find said mount? Lastly, how do I know that the red dot thingy is actually pointing at the thing the telescope sees because I don't think that it's right. Thanks for reading. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Line the scope on something far away during the day time and then adjust the dot till it hits where the scope is pointing.

Any astro shop will sell an eq mount and rings for your scope what you intend to do with the scope and how big a payload will determine how much you pay.

As to what you will see. The moon will be good. You will see Jupiter and 4 of its moons, saturn and it's rings. mars but not brilliantly

and a few of the brighter dso's

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Once you have your red dot lined up with the main scope have a look at the fuzzy patch below Orion's belt. Start out using the eyepiece with the highest number on it (that will give the lowest magnification but the brightest image). The fuzzy patch is the great Orion nebula, a huge cloud of dust and gas, a star factory 1,400 light years away :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also have a go at Jupiter which looks like a bright star rising in the east in early evening. See if you can pick out the moons and the two dark cloud bands. Start with your eyepiece with the lowest power....it is probably labelled 20 or 25mm..

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Neutron, your scope should be good for solar system objects (planets), the Moon and some of the brighter double stars, some dso's (Andromeda, Orion nebula, M45 and so on) but not enough light-gathering power for the feinter galaxies or planetary nebula, but a good start in astronomy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I'm a complete newbie and just have a few questions about my telescope. Firstly, how far should I be able to see with it, like should I be able to see deep space objects or just stuff inside the solar system? Also, is it possible to attach an equatorial mount to it and if so, where can I find said mount? Lastly, how do I know that the red dot thingy is actually pointing at the thing the telescope sees because I don't think that it's right. Thanks for reading. ;)

All astronomical targets are focused at infinity, so there is no difference between a solar system planet and a galaxy millions of light years away.

The red dot finder needs to be aligned with your scope. First point your main scope at the moon or a bright planet, then centre the moon/planet in your eyepiece. Then you adjust the red dot finder and put the dot on the moon/planet. This aligns your red dot with the scope.

IMHO, don't bother with equatorial mount for your scope. Your scope's optics isn't worth it. A basic EQ3-2 mount cost £175 and you will still be limited by the poor department store optics in the Jessop. You can get a Heritage 130p dob for £140 which will give you significant improvement in your viewing experience. Jessops scope belongs to a category we advise people to avoid, but since you bought one already, we will try our best to help you get the most out of it.

I'd recommend you visit a local astronomical society to try some of their scopes before you consider an upgrade.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.