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jimness

Jupiter from 11th Nov (my first of the year)

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Morning all,

Been a bit slow sharing this cos I keep trying to reprocess to get a better result - this one is from 90s captures in each channel, de-rotated the AVIs in Winjupos, but I've just aligned the final RGB images in Photoshop. I'm having real trouble with the RGB image de-rotation process in Winjupos; it seems to add loads of noise that's not there in the source images...? Anyone else seen this?

Anyway, this one is still somewhat noisy but I'm fairly satisfied considering I haven't done much with this equipment for a while!

I got several other captures that night so am considering doing a little animation just for giggles. Haven't tried that before.

Cheers folks

Jim

8183551937_acfbd74a34.jpg

Celestron 9.25" SCT, DMK21 w/ ICX618 cip, Astronomik LRGB filters, EQ6

SE London murky smoggy 'orrible skies

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Some nice detail in there. You may want to try RGB align in Registax to help remove the red and blue rings. The "noise" you are getting from Winjupos may just be as a result of bad alignment, so you may want to check you have input the time correctly and play around with the alignment circle to make sure it is set properly on each of the R, G and B.

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Some nice detail in there. You may want to try RGB align in Registax to help remove the red and blue rings. The "noise" you are getting from Winjupos may just be as a result of bad alignment, so you may want to check you have input the time correctly and play around with the alignment circle to make sure it is set properly on each of the R, G and B.

Thanks Freddie, I think you're onto something here! As for inputting the time correctly, it should be the exact mid-point of the capture in UT, right? The thing is it appears to be only accurate to 1/10th of a minute - so if it's (say) 00:00.15, I have to enter 00:00.2 or 00:00.3 when I really want to enter 00:00.25....or have I completely misunderstood that field?

I guess another useful thing would be to synch my laptop time with some online time server (do those things still exist?)

Cheers

Jim

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My experience of this is that the time is not super super critical but does need to be right and depends to some degree on the quality of the R, G and B images. If you want to be as accurate as possible, you should use the time the reference alignment frame used for stacking from the AVI was captured. I think making certain the alignment on each image is spot on and the RGB align in Regi would give you the greatest improvement. Let us know how you get on.

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Cheers for the advice Freddie. Here's a Winjupos reprocess with the time set to the start of the AVI, as I tend to use an early frame for alignment. Bit of NR in Photoshop etc., then a size reduction which I think helps a bit.

8180527106_625910b85b_o.jpg

Jim

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loving the detail you have captured here mate!!! :) i recently imaged jupiter for the 1st time ever a few days ago :) i see that a lot of people rotate the planet in PP how come people dont leave it as it is? just noticing it a lot lately? im very new to AP also :)

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