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Magellanic Clouds and Good Astro Books

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So I was reading a book called "A guide to Backyard Astronomy" and they were talking about what kind of things to view from your location. They mentioned that we can’t see Magellanic Clouds from the northern hemisphere (I live in the US). Is that true? Also, where would I be able to view them?

Secondly going to the book part, which astronomy books do you find most helpful to the begginer astronomer trying to find his /her way around the sky? I just though one question for a thread, being that the question isnt that in depth, would be wasteful. Thanks!

Clear Skies

-Rand0m

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You can see magellanic clouds from southern hemisphere. I used to live in Australia and you can definitely see them there.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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The statement that they cannot be seen from the Northern Hemisphere is not completely accurate. But you do need to be pretty close to the equator. For example at a latitude of 10o, the SMC right now peaks at an altitude of about 7o above the horizon and the LMC (a few hours later would be approximately 10o above the horizon. Not exactly positioned for outstanding views, but would be visible from a dark site with a clear horizon.

Much better to travel south though if you really want great views.

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I saw them from South Africa, both with the naked eye and in 15x70 bins. Stunning! If ever you go to the southern hemisphere (around Xmas for example), be sure to bring something for stargazing. 47 Tucanae was also well worth a peek.

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I saw them from South Africa, both with the naked eye and in 15x70 bins. Stunning! If ever you go to the southern hemisphere (around Xmas for example), be sure to bring something for stargazing. 47 Tucanae was also well worth a peek.

Agreed. I saw them both from Namibia last year at the end of September / beginning of October. As well as 47 Tucanae, the Tarantula Nebula is stunning. The view in the 12" telescope I was using was comparable to M42, the Orion Nebula. When you consider that the Tarantula is actually in the LMC and as such about 160,000 light years away, it makes you realise just what an incredible star forming region it is.

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Agreed. I saw them both from Namibia last year at the end of September / beginning of October. As well as 47 Tucanae, the Tarantula Nebula is stunning. The view in the 12" telescope I was using was comparable to M42, the Orion Nebula. When you consider that the Tarantula is actually in the LMC and as such about 160,000 light years away, it makes you realise just what an incredible star forming region it is.

I know I should have brought a bigger scope ;)

The Tarantula is already stunning in my 15x70s (the old ones, not the Helios I have now). I think it is better than M42 in bins.

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I lived in Brazil and It was easy to find it in any dark sky location. A real treat if you can go there.

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Depending on what equipment you have, books such as Star Hopping by Robert Garfinkle, The Illustrated Guide to Astronomical wonders, TL@O as already mentioned and I don`t doubt there will a few more recommendations for you to consider before long :)

John.

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