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SKYTEE 2 Issues


enigma
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If I unlock the two knobs on my new Skytee 2 mount and turn the altitude slow motion control I see that the altitude axis for the vertical dovetail still rotates while the altitude axis for the horizontal dovetail does not. Is this normal?

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I have a few more questions (and probably some others later):

What is the purpose of the two locking screws on the vertical axis?

What is the three empty screw holes around the horizontal axis next to where the counterweight rod is installed?

Is there a correct position that dovetails should be installed (there are four holes on each base that allow the dovetail to be installed on multible angles)?

The mount seems very solid, is a counterweight nessesary with every optical tube or only heavy ones?

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I have a few more questions (and probably some others later):

No problem fire away.

What is the purpose of the two locking screws on the vertical axis?

Not sure which you are refering to?

What is the three empty screw holes around the horizontal axis next to where the counterweight rod is installed?

These are locking screws for the end flange. When removed they allow the endflange to be unscrewed from the mount.

Is there a correct position that dovetails should be installed (there are four holes on each base that allow the dovetail to be installed on multible angles)?

Not quite sure what you mean here, pic enclosed of my mount for reference.

The mount seems very solid, is a counterweight nessesary with every optical tube or only heavy ones?

Normally for heavy ota's only. Must be used when mounting a scope on the top mounting.

post-433-0-47243600-1349795037_thumb.jpg

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Do you mean that each of the two dovetail saddles can be moved in altitude individually by using the slow motion controls? Meaning that if the altitude knob is locked both dovetail saddles move in altitude together and if it is unlocked only the vertical (top) dovetail saddle moves? Does this mean that when the altitude knob is not locked, the altitude axis gears are still engaged and wouldn't this cause damage when moving the axis manually? I assume that your answer does not apply for the azimuth axis as by leaving the azimuth knob unlocked it does not allow to use the slow motion control to move only the vertical (top) dovetail saddle.

What is the purpose of the two locking screws on the vertical (top) dovetail (one on its azimuth and one on its altitude axis)?

There are four holes that can be used to screw each of the two dovetail saddles on the vertical (top) and horizontal (side) bases on the mount. On the dovetail saddles there are only two holes and this allows different mounting positions.

For an optical tube around 5-6kg mounted horizontally would a counterweight be nessesary?

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Do you mean that each of the two dovetail saddles can be moved in altitude individually by using the slow motion controls? No they will move together Meaning that if the altitude knob is locked both dovetail saddles move in altitude together and if it is unlocked only the vertical (top) dovetail saddle moves? Does this mean that when the altitude knob is not locked, the altitude axis gears are still engaged and wouldn't this cause damage when moving the axis manually? With the locks off you can move the mount freely, this will not damage anything. I assume that your answer does not apply for the azimuth axis as by leaving the azimuth knob unlocked it does not allow to use the slow motion control to move only the vertical (top) dovetail saddle..The locks engage the worm gears and so you then use the slow motion controls.

What is the purpose of the two locking screws on the vertical (top) dovetail (one on its azimuth and one on its altitude axis)? These are released to allow the top saddle to be lined up with the main scope mount. It enables the user to point both scopes at the same point in the sky.

There are four holes that can be used to screw each of the two dovetail saddles on the vertical (top) and horizontal (side) bases on the mount. On the dovetail saddles there are only two holes and this allows different mounting positions. Usually use holes that place the dovetail in a central position.

For an optical tube around 5-6kg mounted horizontally would a counterweight be nessesary? Not if placed on the main end saddle, if placed on the top saddle i would use a counter weight.

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Back to my original question. If the altitude altitude knob is locked, turning the altitude slow motion control rotates both dovetails (top and side). If the altitude knob is not locked, turning the slow motion control rotates only the top dovetail saddle. Is this normal?

The same does not apply for the azimuth knob which only operates in the locking position for both dovetails.

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Back to my original question. If the altitude altitude knob is locked, turning the altitude slow motion control rotates both dovetails (top and side). If the altitude knob is not locked, turning the slow motion control rotates only the top dovetail saddle. Is this normal? No? Not if the two lock screws for the top mounting are not locked. The two mounts should both move together at all times. Hope that makes sense.

The same does not apply for the azimuth knob which only operates in the locking position for both dovetails.

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OK, if the altitude altitude knob is locked, turning the altitude slow motion control rotates both mounts (top and side). If the altitude knob is not locked and the two lock screws for the top mount are also not locked turning the slow motion control rotates only the top mount. If the altitude knob is not locked and the two lock screws for the top mount are locked turning the slow motion control rotates both mounts. Is this how it should be? But why does the slow motion control for the altitude axis still operates when the knob is not locked?

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OK, if the altitude altitude knob is locked, turning the altitude slow motion control rotates both mounts (top and side).Yes If the altitude knob is not locked and the two lock screws for the top mount are also not locked turning the slow motion control rotates only the top mount. Cannot understand how this is possible. The worm acts on the end mount not the top mount. Ie If the altitude knob is not locked and the two lock screws for the top mount are locked turning the slow motion control rotates both mounts. Is this how it should be? Yes But why does the slow motion control for the altitude axis still operates when the knob is not locked? This sounds like the Knob (Clutch) is not releasing fully. Or could be drag if no ota's are on the mount when doing this. The mount appears quite stiff when not loaded, but is a joy to use when scopes are in place.

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Actually no optical tube was on the mount while I was doing the above tests. Now with an optical tube on the mount the slow motion controls seem to operate only when the altitude knob is locked. The mount does seem pretty stiff though when moving manually.

Do you think I should ask about returning the mount or should everything be OK?

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The mount seems very stiff even when loaded with a 4" f/9 refractor with 2" accessories and this might make movement a little difficult.

By the way it in the box there was only the mount, the two dovetail saddles and the counterweight rod, but no printed manual or any tools (I only ordered the head). Is anything missing and can I find a manual online (I searched without luck).

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By the way it in the box there was only the mount, the two dovetail saddles and the counterweight rod, but no printed manual or any tools (I only ordered the head). Is anything missing and can I find a manual online (I searched without luck). Non that i know of. The mount is simple to use and will not take you long to master.

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The one I was loaned for a while was very stiff too - even with a 24 lb 6" refractor on board. The dovetail clamps were not up to much either on that one. It was an early model though so I'd hope those issues have been addressed now.

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Hi John

They are still a little stiff but very good when loaded.

The saddles are rubbish and most owners upgrade to ADM ones...they ought be included.

I am very impressed with mine and it is great with a Bresser 152 and Intes 715.

Best regards

John

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mine didnt come with a manual - just had a play and worked it out from there :)

the four holes on the end are for different pucks - they are circa 1M difference in width - the smaller holes were used with standard puck from skywatcher. the bigger holes can be used for bigger pucks (eg ADM puck for ~£60 from FLO)

I get same thing happening on my mount with regards to movement and unlocked clutch - unloaded turning the slow mos moves the mount - with loaded mount the slo mo only works with clutch on

the movement on mine is not too stiff but not too free -with a SW250pds on side and 2x5kg as counterbalance, the scope can be freely moved with clutches loose and keeping position - providing smaller EP used.

Really impressed with it - no plans to sell it :)

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What is the three empty screw holes around the horizontal axis next to where the counterweight rod is installed?

These are locking screws for the end flange. When removed they allow the endflange to be unscrewed from the mount.

I can't see the locking screws (or their heads) inside the holes.

The holes seem to be approximately 10mm deep. How are these screws removed?

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