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Star Gazer

NGC1499 - California Nebula

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I read and enjoy this form a lot. I wish I was able to post more (some) content, but I haven't been out for ages. Anyway got out last hight determined to get 1499. Started out taking 200 sec subs with my un-modded 7D. Then mister Moon came out to play, so decided to reduce the exposures to 100 secs (not really sure if that was a good strategy?

Anyway here's the result of stacking in DSS (i'm not a fan of DSS but it seemed to have been good to me this time) and a histogram stretch in PI.

PA: using Alignmaster

Captue: BYE

Comments and criticism welcome.

NGC1499 DSS PI

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i was going to go for this last night but the moon put me off great job though !

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Lovely image Tim - especially nice to see this all in one frame rather than just a clip as often seen in small chip CCDs

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