Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

Just joined SGL


vandrew
 Share

Recommended Posts

Bought my first telescope a few weeks back (a Skywatcher Skymax 127 SynScan goto telescope). Every time I have tried to set it up the cloud has come over or it started to rain (good ol Britsh weather).

However the other night i grabbed a few moments when the moon was pretty full and just pointed it tp the sky .........what i saw blew me away! the detail was unbelievable.......so tonight the weather forescast is clear sky and I am going to attempt to set up the computer goto system on it and see what i can find!

Any tips from seasoned pros most welcome :smiley:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome along - everyone on here is so helpful - just ask away.

One tip is to download Stellarium - its free planetarium software and great for planning a nights observing.

And if it stays clear tonight you should definitely point your scope in the direction of Jupiter - an awesome sight.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

welcome to this great site. im sure you will find it really useful. as for some advice i would recommend setting up during the day, as much as you can, to familiarise yourself with your new scope. just so your not fumbling around in the dark too much.

good luck with those clear skies im sure you will be impressed with the views you will get. some breath-taking sights up there.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome to the forum. Top place to hang around with some very helpful and smart folks. On a side note, please let us know how you get on with the 127. I am considering investing in one myself as a second 'scope which would be better for planetary photography than my Skywatcher Explorer 130.

I would be most intersted to see how you find it :)

Clera skies.....

Scott.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Vandrew and welcome to the forum. Hopefully the weather will play along with you for you to get your first proper observation in. Using GOTO to find those targets will be such a joy to use, especially if a bit of late cloud does arrive as you can select your target and just wait for a gap in the clouds - bliss!!! :grin: :grin:

Clear skies and enjoy the forum

James

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

welcome to this great site. im sure you will find it really useful. as for some advice i would recommend setting up during the day, as much as you can, to familiarise yourself with your new scope. just so your not fumbling around in the dark too much.

good luck with those clear skies im sure you will be impressed with the views you will get. some breath-taking sights up there.

This was the first lesson I learnt! trying to align the finder with the tube in the dark was impossible! so that was the first night and a failure.....have done this in the day light already :smiley:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome to the forum. Top place to hang around with some very helpful and smart folks. On a side note, please let us know how you get on with the 127. I am considering investing in one myself as a second 'scope which would be better for planetary photography than my Skywatcher Explorer 130.

I would be most intersted to see how you find it :)

Clera skies.....

Scott.

I will let you know Scott......it may be a while though....got some learning to do i think! I did choose this because I have just got back in to photography with an Olympus E420 and wanted to hook it up to this scope......think I may be running before i walk though!
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will let you know Scott......it may be a while though....got some learning to do i think! I did choose this because I have just got back in to photography with an Olympus E420 and wanted to hook it up to this scope......think I may be running before i walk though!

Don't be too down on yourself before you have a crack at it. It is, to be fair, simple enough to set up and do still imaging, and the Moon is fairly straightforward as long as you know your way around a DSLR and it's settings. The optical tube becomes something of a huge lens! Photographing a full moon is bright enough to allow reasonably fast shutter speeds and if you use a wide enough eyepiece, it is easier to keep the disc in the field of view.

I know from when I had an E510, the self timer implements mirror lock on the camera and yours is the same, as vibration is the enemy of sharp astro shots!!

I had a go at the Moon earlier this week (see my post on Photo's with SW 130 in the Lounge) with relative success. I also took some video footage of Jupiter with my Pentax Kx.

I am no expert at AP and there are others here who use webcams and specialist CCD cameras to capture some fabulous images of planets and deep space objects which I see as a source of inspiration and a potential route myself in the future.

But back to now, grab yourself a T adaptor and an eyepiece or barlow with a screw thread to attach the Olympus, shoot RAW and post process. It is a learning curve but very rewarding.

Good luck :)

Scott.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.