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markarian

NGC 7789 White Rose Cluster

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Came across this one by accident while moving the telescope around in CdC. A rather nice cluster don't you think?

RC8 f/8 14x120s 350D modded

More details here.

Mark

ngc7789.jpg

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That is a nice cluster, great capture of its colour. :)

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Yes, nice cluster :)

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Very nice pic - you've got a couple of vars in there including a faint red Mira - hope you'll forgive the overlay below :rolleyes:

post-21003-0-99078400-1349510786_thumb.j

Edited by nytecam

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Thanks for the comments guys.

Definitely don't mind the overlay nytecam. Thanks for the info :smiley:

Mark

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lovely cluster - one of my faves from a dark site. surely Mira is in Cetus?

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Mira type variable ;)

This is a great looking cluster. I'm going to have to go looking for it.

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ahh sorry. you learn something new every day! I have never really looked at variables.....so much to have a go at in this excellent hobby.

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Mira type variable ;)

This is a great looking cluster. I'm going to have to go looking for it.

It is quite faint - I was struggling to see it clearly through my 80mm guidescope. But I have a lot of LP here - so a dark site would be necessary I think.

M

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lovely cluster - one of my faves from a dark site. surely Mira is in Cetus?

It is - should have said Mira-type and there's lots of them :shocked: Edited by nytecam

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