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The Warthog

X marks the spot

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For the last couple of weeks, some lunar observers have been hyping the lunar 'X' that appears once in each lunation, for about an hour and a half. So, tonight I rushed home from the restaurant where I had dinner, after buying some beer and single-malt, and set up my scope, switching the Newt for the refractor, and then stumbled about the back yard trying to find a place I could see the Moon from. Managed after a while to get a decent spot, near enough to the pond that if I stepped back in surprise, I would fall in.

I was looking through the 9mm Ortho (111x) that I usually leave in the scope, and saw the X almost immediately. I must say I was totally underwhelmed. It's a very tiny bright mark that looks like one of the exes your maths teacher made you draw for algebra. It is formed by the meeting of the high parts of the walls of craters Stoffler H and Nasireddin, near Stofler (which is much more interesting) and Maurolycus. I looked at it under three diferent magnifications, and it didn't get any better.

I took a couple of pictures, thanks to the camera nosepiece that KK sent me (thanks again!) and I'll get those done when I use up the film. Taking the pictures is a bit chancy, as I can no longer easily get batteries for the camera. I tried, eh?

I looked over Tranquillitatis and Serenitatis, hoping to come up with some of the wrinkle wridges I should have looked for last night, but the sun is already too high. Some of the features I could clearly see yesterday are already obscure.

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I love your short reports WH......its nice to hear the voice of the completely honest astronomer. Especially the word "Underwhelmed", which I have felt many times!!! Its good to be reminded that not all the sights through the scope give us that wow factor.

JV

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I love your short reports WH......its nice to hear the voice of the completely honest astronomer. Especially the word "Underwhelmed", which I have felt many times!!! Its good to be reminded that not all the sights through the scope give us that wow factor.

JV

Perhaps you know who penned the maxim. "To Thine Own Self Be True" JV. I agree with it whole heartedly. If it is practiced, then the result is total honesty towards others. It generates satisfaction without smugness.

I've just made a grab for my jacket.

Ron. ;)

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Better luck next time WH. :thumbup: The 'Purbach Cross' is an interesting feature, but it's not worth rushing home for. That being said, I do have to admit that it IS pretty neat the first time you see it. :wink:

My first sighting was purely by accident. Not knowing what it was, I sent an image to Chuck Wood with an email explaining where I thought it was located, and asked him if there was a name for it.

A few months later he put it on LPOD and used part of my email as the text. How embarrassing.. it makes me sound like a bumbling idiot. Got to be careful when sending things to people with websites, I guess. ;)

Anyway, the image was taken just after sunset and was grossly over-processed (sorry about that) in an attempt to kick up the contrast. I've attached a toned-down version of the LPOD image, and also a wider view of the area (taken in 2003) as a guide for anyone who would like to catch it next month.

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I love your short reports WH......its nice to hear the voice of the completely honest astronomer. Especially the word "Underwhelmed", which I have felt many times!!! Its good to be reminded that not all the sights through the scope give us that wow factor.

JV

Perhaps you know who penned the maxim. "To Thine Own Self Be True" JV. I agree with it whole heartedly. If it is practiced, then the result is total honesty towards others. It generates satisfaction without smugness.

I've just made a grab for my jacket.

Ron. ;)

Shakespeare, in the speech of Polonius to Laertes before he leaves for France, early on in Hamlet. Shakespeare used that speech to reinforce the character of Polonius as a tiresome old blatherer.

You guys were making me blush.

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Better luck next time WH. :thumbup: The 'Purbach Cross' is an interesting feature, but it's not worth rushing home for. That being said, I do have to admit that it IS pretty neat the first time you see it. :wink:

My first sighting was purely by accident. Not knowing what it was, I sent an image to Chuck Wood with an email explaining where I thought it was located, and asked him if there was a name for it.

A few months later he put it on LPOD and used part of my email as the text. How embarrassing.. it makes me sound like a bumbling idiot. Got to be careful when sending things to people with websites, I guess. ;)

Anyway, the image was taken just after sunset and was grossly over-processed (sorry about that) in an attempt to kick up the contrast. I've attached a toned-down version of the LPOD image, and also a wider view of the area (taken in 2003) as a guide for anyone who would like to catch it next month.

I've just had a view like the one in your second picture, but I was in a hurry as the Moon was disappearing behind a tree, and there is nowhere I can put the scope that I can see the Moon for the next couple of hours, until it gets between the big maple in the front and the small apple tree in the back. That apple tree is in for a pruning this winter. Gives some awesome apples, though.

I have a feeling you are quite used to having your pictures published. 8)

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WH, that "X" may be gone by the time the moon is visible again for you. I'm sure I read somewhere that it's only there for an hour or so. ;)

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You are indeed a well read man WH. From that insight into your Shakespeare, I know you live a satisfying life, and totally at ease with yourself. Don't deny it now. :study:

Ron. ;)

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