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Rihard

Extreme Budget AP: Orion Nebula (M42) Single dSLR shot - Old Reprocess

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Hi folks,

this is for the budget AstroPhotography lovers or extremists. :grin: Please comment!

This picture is one of several attempts and was taken a while back (October 2011) with a Nikon D3100 on a tripod and I recently

decided to re-process it after I found out how to nicely play with the histogram in Adobe Lightroom (Since I moved to an apartment just after I bought my scope, all I can do ATM is reprocess my old experiments).

Cannot recall the exact settings at the moment, but they should be as follows:

- Nikon D3100 on a cheap tripod

- Sigma Telezoom 70-300 at 100 mm

- Aperture: F/5.6 or more

- ISO 800 or most likely 1600

- 15" seconds exposure or less

Given the low magnification, star trailing is not showing much. Playing with the histogram in Lightroom allowed me to darken the background getting rid of an orangish gradient / noise caused by the public low pressure lights (see following pic), and to highlight the nebula itself. Noise or I guess hot pixels are showing everywhere in the photo but overal I'm happy with it as it shows that you can see and appreciate what's up there with just few seconds of exposure and without any special equipment worth astronomical prices.

Can this be improved any further?

7808653994_dcbd375d11_b.jpg

The following is the original version I published on Flickr, that is just a JPEG conversion of the original raw file.

6564177223_e78bf3cfea_b.jpg

Any comment / advise will be appreciated.

All my pics (including non-astro) can be found on My Flickr Page.

Clear Skies

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I loved your shot of Sardinia. The only thing I could think of, which may not improve the shot, would be to take a dark frame with the same settings and process it in DSS.

Graham.

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Thanks bricks1000. I think the subject is a bit underexposed in the picture of Sardinia :)

Thanks for the comment Lenny147 :)

Taking a dark frame sounds like a good idea, but I have to find my original RAW to get the exact settings and to do a proper dark subtraction: this could be done also from Photoshop and similar if I am not wrong?

Clear Skies

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show off :p . really nice mate

Scott

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I think that was the first DSO I captured last year and I'm waiting in anticipation for it to come round again to have a go at with new equipment and more experience than the first time :)

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I think that was the first DSO I captured last year and I'm waiting in anticipation for it to come round again to have a go at with new equipment and more experience than the first time :)

Same here :D

excluding the stars, M42 was the first DSO I've ever been able to locate, observe and image (this picture was taken even before I was able to observe it through a telescope), excluding a hint of Andromeda that randomly showed up in a similar picture I've taken in Sardinia while attempting to image the whole sky. And I also have some new equipment (and learning more stuff through SGL, especially from Quatermass :D ) and can't wait to do some "appropriate" imaging. I guess M42 and M31 will be my first targets :p

Clear Skies

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Have you tried taking multiple shots (say 20 or 30 tripod shots) and stacking them in DSS? Until I tried this myself I did not believe you could okay deep sky shots with a just a static tripod.

This photo of Cygnus was something like a stack of 30 ten second shots with a stationary 50mm camera. Taken in a light polluted back garden:

3062-3082_1024_hp_curves.jpg

The trick is to keep the exposure long enough to record detail & short enough not to show too much trailing.

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