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Hi all,

Its been a while since ive been on here. life is busy at the moment.

Ive decided my first scope is going to be a 130P flextube dob.

Im just wondering, when observing distant planets i.e Jupiter or Saturn when keeping it in the POV is there much wobble when touching the OTA?

Cheers

Lewis

Edited by Mansnake
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There's a short video on youtube of , which I took in March with the Heritage 130p and from which I used Registax to produce this image.For the entire moon to pass through the scope webcam's field o

I've done some webcam imaging of the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, Mars and Venus, just with the philips spc900 and the 130p Heritage. The moon images are great and I can just make out detail on Jupiter and

The main vibration problems I have found with mine are from having to place the 'scope on a table. The slightest knock and the table wobbles. When on the floor it isn't bad. But, then it isn't the most comfotable position to be in.

This is my first 'scope so I have nothing to compare it against.

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That's a great scope to start with. When you're looking a planets you'll tend to use higher magnification, so yes, the image will visibly wobble if you touch the tube. That's ok though, try just letting the planet drift across the eyepiece without chasing it too much. Your eye is quite happy with a slowly moving object anyway. Good start and let us know how you get on.

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Thanks for the replies guys. Does the wobble stop quite quickly after touching the tube ?

I'll let you all know how i get on. Oh has anyone done any webcam imaging with their 130P's ?

Lewis

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I use my 130p on just about any flat surface that's available - a picnic bench, a bar stool, a garden deck, oh, and the floor. Yes you will get some vibration when you touch it, especially at higher magnifications, but it's only seconds before it settles down. BTW - I have used a webcam in mine, but you may find that you have to move the secondary mirror down a touch to achieve focus.

Hope this helps.

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Hi Lewis

I have my Heritage usually on a metal framed, glass topped garden table when observing from home and find that when I do knock the scope it settles very quickly (within 2 seconds) even when on higher magnification. I do not take a table when I go to another site as I haven't yet found a stable enough collapsible one so I just sit the scope on the ground. I got fed-up getting sore knees when the scope was stood on the ground so bought a small fold up 3 legged camping chair which has a canvas seat and is the ideal height to reach the ep. I think it cost me about £3.99.

If you take some time to balance the tube in the mount and adjust the bearing tension correctly then the scope is very smooth in operation and shouldn't jerk when tracking. As Hawklord mentioned, putting the object to one side of the ep and letting it travel across the FOV reduces the amount of adjustment and increases viewing comfort.

HTH

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I got fed-up getting sore knees when the scope was stood on the ground so bought a small fold up 3 legged camping chair which has a canvas seat and is the ideal height to reach the ep. I think it cost me about £3.99.

Albenn, have you got a link to that camping chair at all ?

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I've done some webcam imaging of the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, Mars and Venus, just with the philips spc900 and the 130p Heritage. The moon images are great and I can just make out detail on Jupiter and the rings of Saturn are clearly visible. To see more detail requires a Barlow lens, I have the Tal 3x which is great. However, its extremely difficult to manually move the scope in order to get the planet on the webcam chip, the slightest nudge knocks the planet off the chip/laptop screen. I managed it via the Barlow with Jupiter once for a few seconds (which looked much bigger with more detail) but I then needed to adjust the webcam capture settings in order to capture the best image and couldn't find Jupiter again. Therefore, I've bought a Skywatcher Synscan mount for tracking and the goto facility which I'll be able to try out once the dark nights start drawing in. In short, the optics should produce some great images but the manual dob tracking is a pain!

Edited by Hermit
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Do you mean this sort of thing?

http://www.amazon.co...45045088&sr=1-3

Thanks for that !

To see more detail requires a Barlow lens, I have the Tal 3x which is great. However, its extremely difficult to manually move the scope in order to get the planet on the webcam chip, the slightest nudge knocks the planet off the chip/laptop screen.

I thought this might be the case. Lunar imaging it is for now then. What kind of frame times can i get when lunar imaging before i have to adjust the OTA to compensate for rotation ?

Edited by Mansnake
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I thought this might be the case. Lunar imaging it is for now then. What kind of frame times can i get when lunar imaging before i have to adjust the OTA to compensate for rotation ?

Usually up to 20 seconds-worth of frames before you have to re-point the OTA. I can't remember what the frames per second rate was, this can vary.

For an idea of what you can capture with a webcam, have a look here, which have all been taken by me. I haven't stacked any lunar videos yet, I just took a still via Windows Movie Maker, but the planet shots were stacked via Registax:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B0039ZM14Q/ref=cm_ciu_pdp_images_all

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Stupid question re lunar imaging with the Heritage dob. Or any dob for that matter.

Would each individual frame have to be lined up exactly the same after the manual adjustment. For example with the full moon in the exact centre of the eyepiece each time or a specific crater. Or does a program such as Registax overcome such things?

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I'm not sure whether you have to manually set alignment points in Registax (I never did that for my planet shots, but I've not had enough experience yet), but Registax should be able to sort that out for you - you wouldn't need to line it up exactly as the last view.

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Which webcams do people use with the 130P Flextube ? i know the SPC900 is well sort after because of the CCD chip but they are like gold dust. Also i think some of the newer CMOS cams have better quality now ?

Any suggestions ?

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Thanks for that !

I thought this might be the case. Lunar imaging it is for now then. What kind of frame times can i get when lunar imaging before i have to adjust the OTA to compensate for rotation ?

There's a short video on youtube of

, which I took in March with the Heritage 130p and from which I used Registax to produce this image.

For the entire moon to pass through the scope webcam's field of view takes about two minutes

& yes, registax can handle that whole thing with minimum guidance.

Which webcams do people use with the 130P Flextube ? i know the SPC900 is well sort after because of the CCD chip but they are like gold dust. Also i think some of the newer CMOS cams have better quality now ?

Any suggestions ?

I have been using a 'Trust' branded generic CMOs cam for £7 from B&M, which was OK. I'm now using the Quickcam Pro 4000, which is better in almost every way, but I have found it is very unforgiving when focussing.

There are some odds and ends in my gallery if you want to see what sort of images you can achieve with your new scope :).

Edited by dav1d
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Ah well...It's when you strap your Android phone to your scope with an app called SkEye in indirect mode. You line it up on a couple of stars so the app knows where it is, & then it'll tell you in which direction to push the scope to find any other objects.

The only thing is, when it's too close to the metal part of the OTA, it gives a 'strange magnetic field' warning, so it needs to be a few inches out on some kind of packing material.

It's not perfect, but it's OK. :)

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Ah well...It's when you strap your Android phone to your scope with an app called SkEye in indirect mode. You line it up on a couple of stars so the app knows where it is, & then it'll tell you in which direction to push the scope to find any other objects.

The only thing is, when it's too close to the metal part of the OTA, it gives a 'strange magnetic field' warning, so it needs to be a few inches out on some kind of packing material.

It's not perfect, but it's OK. :)

lol nice. ill have to try that with my galaxy s2 when i get my scope.

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Oh one more question.

How will i know if the scope needs colimating after transit ? Will i need an EP to do find out ? or can i tell just by checking something.

Not having ever done it, but according to TLAO, de-focus on a bright star and it should look like a donut - if the hole isn't in the middle, it will need colimating.

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