Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

TractionMan

Telrad as the only finder?

Recommended Posts

When I got my new telescope I decided to get a Telrad as well (after reading lots of good reviews about it) and it really is a sweet piece of equipment. Easy to align, easy to use and so on. However I didn't get along with the 6x30 finderscope that came with the OTA. It just made me dizzy looking through it so I thought a RACI would be better. Actually I ended up removing the finder mounting shoe to get a better placement for the Telrad (only mounted with zip ties at the moment). But, now a question popped into my noobish little head and of course I just have to ask. Does anyone use the Telrad, or Rigel for that matter, as your only finder? Or am I better off with a finderscope as well, RACI in that case I think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's personal choice, but I hate finders.

When I did visual, it was Telrad and nothing else :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do only visual astronomy and find a Telrad / RDF all I need for about 90% of my viewing. There are times / objects where an optical finder is very useful so I add an 8x50 RACI finder to my scope then. Most of the time it's non-optical for me though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the Telrad work for you as it does 99% of people that use it, ditch the finder scope as its unwanted weight and just gets in the way.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. You all confirm what I had hoped you'd do. That a finderscope may be redundant most of the time if a Telrad is mounted on the telescope. :grin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Telrad only, coupled with a big (40mm) eyepiece to allow you to find fuzzies.

Ditch the finder (he says having a finder on all his scopes)!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use both Rigel Quikfinder and R.A.C.I 10x50 finder on my Dob. I suppose if I noticed weight problems I could get by happily with just the Rigel. I like the 10x50 for more accuracy when zeroing in on harder to find objects. I think if the Telrad is heavier then I would use it on its own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest you use both,but get a good 9x50 Right Angle Finder.

I lot depends on what your interested in.If you are chasing say Dounble Stars of 8th and higher magnitude,i dont think the Telrad,would get you there.Yes it would get close,but then refer to the star charts for your faint Double,and look for a pattern of stars that contains your double.You can then look for that pattern through the Finder scope.allowing of course for reverse orientation.Even some of the Brighter Galaxies can be glimpsed in a good finder.

You can of course get Telrad Degree overlays for your star charts,and that will help even further.

The more you practise the more familiar it will become.

So i say both.

Mick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to combine using binoculars alongside my telescope, there are times when I use them to assist in locating and positioning an object, and then referring back to my combination of telrad and low power wide field eyepiece, which is all I use most of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Telrad, finder, binoculars and a low power eyepiece, depending on the sky conditions and what I'm looking for.

It gets second nature to identify just where you need to be with a Telrad though.

A finder is invaluable as far as I am concerned when looking for new objects, especially faint stuff that requires you to star-hop.

You could argue with a go-to scope you don't even need a finder...until your powersource is gone !

Each has its merits, why confine yourself to just one ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Telrad looks interesting to me so I checked online to see what it was about. It looks like something I could use but as I am a beginner could someone be kind enough to advise me if it would be suitable for use on my Celestron nexstar 6se? Or would there be no point in getting it as my scope is not exactly a monster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although not a telrad, I too only use a RDF. My 9x50 finder is still in situ, but converted to a guide scope with a qhy5 on it. Can't say I miss having an optical finder tbh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RDF any day, I have a Sky Surfer 5, brilliant bit of kit, I swear by it....

Edited by Si W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Heritage 130P came with a pretty neat little rdf. I love how it centres in so fast on the object I want to look at.

My 200P DS came with a big, heavy 9x50 scope finder. It Would be great if only I could see the cross hairs when it's dark.

I want a Telrad...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting to read your opinions here. Since I'm used to the RDF that came with the Heritage (works really well) and discovered that the Telrad was even easier to set up and use when I got the new scope, I got curious about the actual need for a finderscope. I think for now I'll just use the Telrad as my only finder (still a noob and got plenty to learn). Thanks alot for your input and help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think if I were under light polluted skies then I'd use a RACI finder aswell as Telrad but as it stands I'm a Telrad only man. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Heritage 130P came with a pretty neat little rdf. I love how it centres in so fast on the object I want to look at.

My 200P DS came with a big, heavy 9x50 scope finder. It Would be great if only I could see the cross hairs when it's dark.

I want a Telrad...

I wish I couldn't see my cross hairs when it is dark.......

I am lost without my Telrad and lost without my 9x50mm RACI finder - I like both and use them constantly to good effect. would not be without either unless it's 'impossible' to balance the scope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to combine using binoculars alongside my telescope, there are times when I use them to assist in locating and positioning an object, and then referring back to my combination of telrad and low power wide field eyepiece, which is all I use most of the time.

Oh right, I always bring my binos to use alongside the telescope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Telrad only for me along with telrad star maps and an eyepiece that gives me a 1.6 degree TFoV. There may come a point when I'll need a RACI finder to locate fainter objects but I haven't reached that point yet :grin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Telrad only for me too. I suppose if I had a *really* nice finder I might use it. But I don't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Telrad looks interesting to me so I checked online to see what it was about. It looks like something I could use but as I am a beginner could someone be kind enough to advise me if it would be suitable for use on my Celestron nexstar 6se? Or would there be no point in getting it as my scope is not exactly a monster.

Since your Celestron NexStar 6se has computerized goto and a Star Pointer red dot finder (RDF), I'm not sure that a Telrad would be worthwhile, except that some prefer the Telrad to RDFs. Perhaps you could try a Telrad at a star party.

Geoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Telrad only for me too.

I do prefer the baader sky surfer V to the telrad though. It's just so well made and precise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends entirely on how wide a FOV you have in your main scope. If you have a 3 degree maximum field then you only need a Telrad. By the time you get to the big Dobs where the lowest you can go is about 80x then having both becomes a big bonus. On some objects I go from Telrad to EP in the 20 inch but others are best found with the finder employed after the Telrad.

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Lee_P
      Lots of astro kit for sale! Payment via bank transfer or PayPal (buyer to pay fees). Reasonable offers considered.
       
      1. Sky-Watcher Evostar 80ED DS-Pro Outfit with auto focuser upgrade -- £350
      Comes with diagonal, 28mm 2” eyepiece, 2" to 1.25" eyepiece adapter, dovetail, tube rings, SkyWatcher Auto Focuser, HitecAstro DC Focus Controller USB, metal case. Approx. cost new: £562. Buyer to collect from central Bristol, or buyer to arrange for a courier. Note: doesn’t come with a finder / guider, but I have some available (listed below).
      Main items similar to: 
      https://www.firstlightoptics.com/pro-series/skywatcher-evostar-80ed-ds-pro-outfit.html
      https://www.harrisontelescopes.co.uk/acatalog/skywatcher-auto-focuser.html
      http://ensoptical.co.uk/hitecastro-dc-focus-controller-usb
       
      2. Sky-Watcher .85x Reducer/Flattener for ED80 -- £120 inc. recorded delivery to mainland UK 
      https://www.firstlightoptics.com/pro-series/skywatcher-85x-reducer-flattener-for-ed80.html
       
      3. Sky-Watcher Skymax 150 PRO -- £300
      Comes with diagonal, 28mm 2” eyepiece, and dovetail. Note: doesn’t come with a finder / guider, but I have some available (listed below). Buyer to collect from central Bristol, or buyer can arrange for a courier.
      It's an earlier version of this: https://www.firstlightoptics.com/maksutov/skywatcher-skymax-150-pro.html
      Works well with items 7, 8, and 9.
       
       
      4. Sky-Watcher 9x50 and QHY5 mono guidescope -- £150 inc. recorded delivery to mainland UK
      Includes T thread adapter attaching the QHY5 to the finderscope. Also includes kit to convert into a regular optical finderscope. 
       
      5. Sky-Watcher 9x50 Finderscope -- £30 inc. delivery to mainland UK
      https://www.firstlightoptics.com/finders/skywatcher-9x50-finderscope.html
       
      6. Sky-Watcher EQ3 PRO mount -- £220
      In pretty good condition, and includes the handset for full goto functionality. Unboxed. Buyer to collect from central Bristol, or buyer can arrange for a courier.
      It's an earlier version of this: https://www.firstlightoptics.com/skywatcher-mounts/skywatcher-eq3-pro-synscan-goto.html
       
      7. Astrozap Dew Heater Tape, 6" 'scope -- £30 inc. delivery to mainland UK
      https://www.firstlightoptics.com/dew-prevention/astrozap-dew-heater-tapes.html
       
      8. Astrozap Flexible Dew Shield for Skymax 150 -- £20 inc. delivery to mainland UK
      https://www.firstlightoptics.com/dew-prevention/astrozap-flexible-dew-shield.html
       
      9. StarSharp Bahtinov Focus Mask 150mm Maksutov -- £10 inc. delivery to mainland UK
      https://www.firstlightoptics.com/bahtinov-focus-masks/starsharp-bahtinov-focus-masks.html
       
      Items 1 and 4:


      Item 2:

       
      Items 3, 5, 7:

       
      Item 5:

       
      Item 6:

       
      Item 8:

       
      Item 9:

    • By A McEwan
      Selling some accessories. A couple of Meade DS 4000 Super Plossls, 9.7mm and 26mm. Both in bolt cases and in great condition.
      £15 each or £25 for the pair.
      Skywatcher 6x30 finderscope with caps and mount. Some scuff marks on the mount foot, as to be expected. Optics nice and clean.
      £17.
      Postage at cost.
       





    • By Ardrid
      Hi everyone,
      I was lucky enough to get a 12" Skywatcher Dobsonian (305mm/1500mm) for Christmas. It shipped with a 10mm Plossl and a 25mm Plossl, both 52° AFOV. Finally had a clear enough night to try it out and I absolutely loved it. I researched a bunch over the last year so I knew this was the scope I wanted should someone want to get me a really sweet gift before I grabbed it myself. What I didn't research at the time was accessories and equipment, something I've been doing relentlessly over the past few days.
      I'll primarily be viewing in the backyard until I find a great viewing spot (and a good way to safely transport). Light pollution isn't terrible but I haven't fully gauged its impact on seeing fainter objects. I'm not interested in imagery/photography at the moment. Not foreclosing on the idea by any means but everything I'm looking to add is purely for visual gratification at this point. Hoping the experts out there can lead me in the right direction. Here's what I'm trying to figure out:
       
      1. What eyepieces should I pick up?
      I've read that, generally speaking, you want 2-3 premium pieces in over to cover low, medium, and high magnification. I'm currently looking at the following "sets": 5mm Nagler, 13mm Ethos, 35mm Panoptic or 6mm Ethos, 13mm Ethos, 21mm Ethos. I'm not overly concerned about price. I recognize that there's going to be a premium associated with a brand like TeleVue and with squeezing out that last drop of performance; however, I don't want to throw away money unnecessarily if I'm not going to see a benefit from pulling out the stops. I'm not beholden to TV by any stretch but everyone says they're the gold standard so I figured I'd look there first. I'm not looking to grab everything at once either. Was thinking of starting with the 13mm Ethos since it would fill the mid-range gap between my 10mm and 25mm. 
      2. Should I grab a Paracorr?
      I've read many comments that go back and forth on this but the consensus seems to be that, while it's not crucial at f/4.9 like it would be with a faster scope, it's something I should probably have in the arsenal if I'm using wide field eyepieces, which the ones I'm contemplating are. I couldn't detect any coma with the two eyepieces I currently have but I suspect I probably wouldn't given the FOV and my beginner status. I also think that once I see it I'm not going to be able to unsee it. 
      3. Should I pick up a Barlow?
      This question assumes I'm not getting a Paracorr. I like the idea of essentially doubling the number of eyepieces I have but I'm not too sure of the ultimate utility/necessity of it.
      4. Any other crucial accessories I should have?
      I'm looking at a Cheshire collimator for when the time comes. Aside from that, is there anything else I should absolutely have?
      5. Finally, any suggestions on transporting?
      It goes without saying but this baby is heavy. I don't have a garage, and I'm hesitant to store it in the shed, so what I've been doing is removing the OTA from the base and transporting them separately to the backyard for setup. It's not bad but I can see it getting old after awhile, especially with numerous viewing sessions in a row. After all, I didn't get this scope so it could collect dust; I want to use it as often as the weather lets me. I do plan on replacing the feet with wheels so I can at least roll it, but I'm trying to figure out a good solution to getting it in and out of the house (down 3 small steps) to the backyard without damaging it or breaking my back. 
      I think that's all I have for now. I appreciate any help you all can provide. I'm just trying to learn as much as I can so I can have a great experience and eventually show my little guy all about the joys of astronomy. Thanks everyone!
    • By KP82
      Recently got a Baader sky surfer iii RDF along with a quick release finder shoe to replace the flimsy plastic 6x30 stock finder on my Bresser AR102xs. The problem is the adjustment of the red dot is very limited. The red dot can only be moved within the lower left quarter of the full circle before neither of the control knobs can be turned any further. As a result I haven't been able to get it aligned with the scope.
      I thought Baader made good quality accessories (the quick release finder shoe is very well engineered), but it looks like either I've got a dud or the unit is not well designed.
      Is the Altair starwave all metal RDF any good? Or can anyone recommend an alternative model?
    • By Dinglem
      Since upgrading mount and guidescope I have some items that are no longer required.
      EQ5 mount AstroEQ controller plus 2 Nema17 motors with homemade brackets, pulleys and belts and RJ11 cords £80 delivered
      Skywatcher 9*50 Finderscope £30 delivered - sold
      Orion Dual Finder Scope Mounting Bracket £20 delivered -sold
      Bank transfer preferred.







×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.