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49 images and 20 darks taken on an eq6 mounted 5D MKII and 24mm lens, 15 second exposures @ f4 iso800. A quick and dirty process through DSS and CS5, next time I'll push it to iso1600 to get more data in the images.

I'm not sure due South looking at the Milky way is the best view to get the meteors because of the satellite traffic in the region, it's like the Olympic traffic lane in rush hour.

gallery_4594_722_12273.jpg

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I cab see one Persied (or sporadic?) in there. Satelites can be a pain though.

Surprisingly most of the visible Perseids were out of the camera view lol A fisheye will be used on one camera this weekend

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Thanks for the info. Didn't know all those satalites where around the MW. I noticed you put your camera on your eq6. With only 15 sec subs and only at 24mm I would think just a regular camera tripod would work just fine? Is there a reason you put it in the mount?

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Thanks for the info. Didn't know all those satalites where around the MW. I noticed you put your camera on your eq6. With only 15 sec subs and only at 24mm I would think just a regular camera tripod would work just fine? Is there a reason you put it in the mount?

I wasnt after a star trail so I used the mount so I could stack all of the images in DSS to get more star depth with less noise. Over several hours a tripod mounted camera will produce a very nice star trail but you could only use some of the images in a stack before field rotation would become an issue. Most of the satellites were clearly visible to the naked eye, but I guess we don't normally notice them

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You've also picked up NGCs 6882, 6885 and 6940, I reckon, and the Coathanger is visible centre bottom.

James

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You've also picked up NGCs 6882, 6885 and 6940, I reckon, and the Coathanger is visible centre bottom.

James

They wont be a problem James I can clone them out ;)

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I wasnt after a star trail so I used the mount so I could stack all of the images in DSS to get more star depth with less noise. Over several hours a tripod mounted camera will produce a very nice star trail but you could only use some of the images in a stack before field rotation would become an issue. Most of the satellites were clearly visible to the naked eye, but I guess we don't normally notice them

So I get that putting it on the mount eliminates star trails all together but since you have nothing visible in your FOV thats on the ground couldn't you just stack them in DSS and DSS would auto rotate them to all stack properly? The only problem would thenbe that you would need to crop it some. Or have I missed something. I haven't done lots of widefield so this is just from my own understand not experience so if I'm wrong my apolagies. I'm currently planning on having my Canon on my ED80 and mount to do an all night shooting while I have my Sony on my regular tripod doing widefield for meteors. I was wanting to do both star trails on no star trails but if theres a conflict I'd like to know a bit ahead of time. Thanks for any help.

Edited by nmoushon

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So I get that putting it on the mount eliminates star trails all together but since you have nothing visible in your FOV thats on the ground couldn't you just stack them in DSS and DSS would auto rotate them to all stack properly? The only problem would thenbe that you would need to crop it some. Or have I missed something. I haven't done lots of widefield so this is just from my own understand not experience so if I'm wrong I apolagies. I'm currently planning on having my Canon on my ED80 and mount to do an all night shooting while I have my Sony on my regular tripod doing widefield for meteors. I was wanting to do both star trails on no star trails but if theres a conflict I'd like to know a bit ahead of time. Thanks for any help.

We move 15 degrees per hour relative to the stars so it wouldn't take too long before you will lose the central area unless you are shooting to the North.

The Sony on a tripod will obviously produce star trails which be processed in Startrails.exe, a free programme. Any meteors captured will look good against a star trail but may be overwhelmed by the brightness of the trails

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They wont be a problem James I can clone them out ;)

Well, since you mention it, some of those stars are a bit distracting :)

James

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We move 15 degrees per hour relative to the stars so it wouldn't take too long before you will lose the central area unless you are shooting to the North

Oh I see what you're saying. Sorry got confused there for some reason. Guess I'll need to plan a bit more then. Thanks.

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Well, since you mention it, some of those stars are a bit distracting :)

James

it always surprises me just how many stars the camera can capture, they do tend to just merge into one big blob lol

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk. Blame Apple for the typos and me for the content

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I like that shot even if it's very busy. I'm hoping to have a test run tonight if it's possible.

If I was to stop the lens down would that effectively make an 18mm more like a 20mm(just examples)?

I would like to take longer than 15 seconds if I can so maybe stopping it down will help a bit.

Also is it true that on the smaller sensor dslr that already happens, I think I have read that but not sure if it is true.

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just to complete this Perseid failure

A timelapse from the early hours of Sunday plus the Saturday sunset, so promising but another epic fail lol. I'd normally say best viewed on Youtube but I wouldn't bother unless you are bored

I did shoot another timelapse from last night and let the camera run through until the morning. Woke up to torrential rain and my camera gear huddling under an umbrella, kinda summed up the whole weekend

no idea where the camera found the umbrella ;)

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