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Another analog image for your consideration.

Taken July 19th under skies of good transparency from 22:13 - 23:23 Local time. Single exposure of 70 minutes on Fuji Acros 100 film using the Pentax 67 and SMC 200mm @ f/5.6.

post-9692-0-44579100-1344298325_thumb.jp

The dense star fields of Scutum.

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Lovely as always Jim. There's something special about film.

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Thank you all. This was the longest I had exposed this area, 70 minutes. It perhaps was too long. These star clouds along the Great Rift are big and bright and so nice to image. As the "Selected Regions of the Milky Way" project comes to a close, a set of black & white silver gelatin prints will be made and are to be part of an exhibit this coming December.

That will be an exciting time.

Jim

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Now that takes some skill, i salute you sir!

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