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Monty

Horizon Special "A Mission To Mars"

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Just to let you all know, on BBC2 right now is an Horizon special "A Mission To Mars". :smiley:

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Darn, missed it. Hopefully will be on iplayer at some point. Thanks for the heads up tho :)

Funnily enough i watched that film called Mission to mars last week

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Just watched it, all I heard throughout it was Mass Effect OST though, made it sound ten times more sci-fi for me. Was a pretty good documentary nonetheless. :tongue:

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One thing it did for me was remind me how good a song 'sweet child of mine' is :p Was quite good though, i must say i can see the landing going horribly wrong though..

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lol i know what you mean about that song matt, nice one for the heads up monty it was a good doc and lets hope the landing is successful!

Jamie

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Yep fingers crossed for the landing. There seems to be soooo many different operations to land the darn thing that there is even more chance of failure.

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Parallel parking my beetle frightens the life out of me so I would hate to be I charge of landing anything

on Mars!

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This was definitely a better program than the last Venus offering. Some nice shots of the MSL clone. I wish thay had of explained the rovers equipment in more detail though, maybe cut a bit of the surfing out (which was nice looking)

Overall a good watch and fingers crossed for Monday morning. Working at JPL must be for stress junkies. But it's good stress I guess, knowing that you have a cool, cutting edge job.

Edited by mindburner

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One thing it did for me was remind me how good a song 'sweet child of mine' is :p Was quite good though, i must say i can see the landing going horribly wrong though..

love that intro !

yup, I had that feeling especially when the timing of the whole thing was described, and the fact they've only unit tested it, not as a complete system ! :-o

blimmin good, just what we expect from Horizon...

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ditto, Mindburner. Nice show overall but they didn't explain a lot of the interesting stuff. e.g. what exactly are the measurement devices? I guess the camera that looks at the laser blasts has a spectroscope in it, but they don't say. Very little info on what SAM does. Does it do mass spec? How does it clean out previous rock samples (or even can it do that?). I also don't understand what the flight team are doing as landing approaches. They seem have an awful lot of work to do during the last few hours, but how much control do they actually have given the time delay?

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curiosity reminds me of number 5 from the film short circuit, a very funny film.........

With excitement like this, who is needing enemas?

I am thinking she is a virgin. Or at least she used to be. :grin:

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Darn, missed it. Hopefully will be on iplayer at some point. Thanks for the heads up tho :)

Funnily enough i watched that film called Mission to mars last week

It's on iplayer now and available until 3rd Sept :)

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