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Rihard

Sun White Light 7th July 2012 (dSLR + Zoom Lens + Filter)

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Hi all,

this is the Sun as seen from southern Ireland the 07th of July.

Single shot taken with a Nikon D3100, Sigma 70-300mm telezoom lens, Baader Solar Filter.

7528956594_35ae601f1f_b.jpg

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