Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss_winners.thumb.jpg.9deb4a8db27e7485a7bb99d98667c94e.jpg

stolenfeather

My transit experience: One I will never forget!

Recommended Posts

First, I would like to say,.. great new look Stargazers Lounge!

I have been wanting to write this for some time now,.. Believe me! Unfortunately, I'm finding it harder to stargaze and report my findings these days. The exam period combined with the extended hours of daylight make it hard for me to make my way unto my porch with the necessary darkness to see anything worthwhile. However, I had been waiting impatiently for this day to arrive for awhile now. It was introduced to the world weeks ago (even if I had known about it for some time) as the astronomical event of the century. This was no fancy name since it would take over a hundred years for this phenomenon to happen again. At first I didn't want to be too excited since I knew that my success in seeing anything would depend on the weather.

When the long range forecast seemed favourable, although a long shot since such predictions are rarely accurate, I extended my efforts to prepare myself. I researched the subject extensively: How could I experience the transit of Venus safely (for both myself and the equipment used). All sources pointed in the same direction: I was not, under any circumstances, to use my telescope since the aperture at 10" was too great. To point it at the sun would result in damaging my oculars and secondary mirror. I came across a project which greatly appealed to me. It involved binoculars, a tripod and the ability to project the image of the sun unto a white piece of paper. I would like to thank this forum for their many helpful suggestions during the preparation for this event.

For this to work properly, I had to add some shadow since the beam of light would not be seen in broad daylight. I therefore added a piece of cardboard paper around the lenses and covered one of the eyepieces for better viewing. It was proposed that I line an extra box with black paper to provide the extra contrast I would need for a pristine view. It was also suggested by some that I could indeed use my telescope if the aperture was reduced to 2". This could easily be done with a piece of plywood but,...

I resisted (well actually, the correct word for it was that I was insecure).

I settled that night with my binocular project and waited for the transit to begin:

IMG-4513.JPG?et=nv8xlx18ovZRbPsOPGuyyw&nmid=0IMG-4516.JPG?et=eV07lswofqg6mkezHjCTxg&nmid=0IMG-4517.JPG?et=p%2Bl9xQg5wSdLqjZA2OsTew&nmid=0

I had trouble sleeping the night before since I had important plans for school and was nervous / excited as to what the next day would bring. At 4:00am I gave up trying to sleep and made my way to the kitchen where a waning strawberry moon (the full moon was the day before) greeted me. It was at that very moment that I knew that everything would turn out fine. In the end, my responsibilities regarding the final examinations at school went extremely well, promising me a successful evening.

Well, not everything went that smoothly at first but,.. I had to believe that it would all work out.

I waited for the transit to commence by watching a countdown online and made my way outdoors. Two of my students had already made their way to my house for the show. I tried in vain to see it but all the projection revealed was a fuzzy glow. Not a speck of Venus could be found. I simply could NOT focus! Frustration set in when my students decided to leave because Venus was giving us a "no show".

It was at that moment that my eyes turned towards my telescope. Some had said on this forum that it could work and my time was running out since the sun was threatening to set over my neighbour's house. I grabbed for my telscope cover which had a hole of 2" already prepared and set up one last time. My husband helped me align the scope and take the picture since it was hard to hold the box and do all of this at the same time.

Once we saw the projection of the sun, we focused the telescope and there it was,...

It was Venus! I admit it,... I cried.

Steven and I took pictures as the sun slowly disappeared behind my neighbour's roof. It was a shadow, a dot,... but it was my dot, my capture, my experience!

transit-of-venus.JPG?et=n5ms0441ExgunmvJLeI8sA&nmid=0

It makes us wonder though:

For a handful of hours (give or take a few), the world had caught a fever that had united them with one quest: To experience the transit. In one evening and one morning (depending which area from earth you viewed it from) there was one goal. It had nothing to do with religion, politics, debatable issues, money,...

It had everything to do with experiencing a small something that was beyond our immediate grasp.

Thank you Venus for sharing your journey, vision and a certain hope for the answers / questions of tomorrow!

Isabelle

Edited by stolenfeather
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for conveying this wonderful event for us Isabelle, in your usual enthusiastic and heartfelt way. Most of us were bathed in clouds...

andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for taking the time to come by Andrew and for the encouraging words. I have to say that this new page is making it hard for me to see responses to posts. I'll have to get used to it!

Isabelle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great read, hope your both well, I had to settle for live streams on Sloosh ,which was ok looks like you got it nailed,great images ,we have a cloud sat over my pc for 7 weeks solid

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also watched the live stream Sloosh once the sun set behind my neighbour's roof. It was really well done! Thanks for coming by Pat! I hope all is well with you too! :)

Isabelle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done for persevering in your quest Isabelle, I was fortunate enough to experience the entire event (and 2004) and to be able to share it with my Chinese and Filipino collegues, but I could never put convey so eloquently as you have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By alanjgreen
      Just bagged 10 minutes between the clouds and got to see the Mercury shadow transit!
      Its so long since I used the Lunt that I took a few seconds to get back into the groove of tuning the double stack and letting some air into the tuner as it was flat.
      Not much else on the disc - 3 x sets of proms, 3 tiny filaments, saw one small bright flux patch briefly.
      But the Mercury shadow was nice and clear and a decent sized patch too.
      Just got back inside before it started spotting with rain! Fingers crossed for another clear patch later ...
      Alan
    • By ian61
      We are hoping to observe the transit in school (Don’t panic - we have done several transits and partial eclipses in the past so we are fine on the safety aspects - thanks). However does anyone know how I can get hold of some links to use in advance of the day that we can use to put some professional feeds up on the large screen tellies we have linked up to the computer systems these days – I am told that links on YouTube are the easiest to handle on the slightly clunky system we have to control them.
      My question comes from reminiscing with colleges that my daughter and I had stayed up to watch first contact of the last transit of Venus live from Hawaii before swapping to Mt Wilson. (We were also up before dawn on top of the local hill fort as the sun rose having lugged an old 4” reflector up there.) Of course at the time we were just browsing through the internet not taking good note of sites we were on.
    • By jambouk
      We are running a session at my local society on transits and occultations. One station will focus on exoplanet transits, and we'd like to build a very simple model to demonstrate this. We have a star (light source) and an orbiting "planet" but I need to work out how to detect the changes in light intensity and display this on a laptop, like a classical transit photometry trace below (taken from https://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/tess/primary-science.html).
      Is there a way to take a feed from a DSLR through the USB output to do this, else I could get an adapter for my ZWO and put an EOS lens on the front of that. I really do want a light intensity vs time trace in real time on the laptop. This model will be run in a darkened room.
      Thanks for any comments.
      James
       

    • By Halil
      Hi All,
      I took this picture by coincidence while trying to take photo of a single cloud on the sky.
      Is this Venus?
      Thanks.
       

       
    • By BinocularSky
      The August edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:
      * A grazing occultation of a bright star
      * Moon occulting stars in the Hyades
      * See both ice giants as well as Vesta
      * Review of the Celestron EclipSmart 10x25 solar binocular
      I hope it helps you to get the best out of these late summer nights with your binoculars or small telescopes.
      To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.
      Warning: Do not attempt to observe the Sun with any optical system that is not specifically designed for the purpose.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.