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Hi,

It looks like its gonna be clear tonight so i might go out and collect some light.

Last time i imaged m51, the image was alright considering. But i found it a bit small. Now im looking for some objects on the nothern hemisphere that will not need a big apperture, nor a modded camera.

The equipment im using:

SW 80 Equinox 80ED

Heq5 Pro

Canon EOS 500d

Regards

Lukas

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Double stars perhaps? Also M13 and M57. Saturn & the moon? A word of warning, don't mention the skies are clear where you are, you may get lynched.:hello2:

In the imaging section you will find some of my efforts with a NexStar 4SE and an EOS 500D, with setting details.

Edited by David JM
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Thanks for your anwser :hello2:

To little magnification for saturn and the moon :/ Dont know about double stars, but i imagine i'd need more magnification to split them.

I was more looking for galaxies or nebulae.

Edited by AstroLuke
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Increasing the aperture isn't going to make anything "bigger" I'm afraid unless it also increases the focal length.

Your 80 (which has a short focal length) plus your DSLR (which has a large sensor) are the perfect combination for wide field imaging.

For chasing the smaller stuff, you will want either a smaller sensor (CCD) or longer focal length scope (the 200P in your sig has this.)

M31 is of course starting to present itself in the early hours, this is the biggest thing I can suggest off the top of my head.

I'm sure some more suggestions will be along soon though :hello2:

Edited by Stephen
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Thanks for your reply! :hello2:

I havent thought of Markarian's chain

Increasing the aperture isn't going to make anything "bigger" I'm afraid unless it also increases the focal length.

With small aperture i meant stuff like faint galaxies where you need a bigger aperture to collect the faint light faster :)

Edited by AstroLuke
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Not the greatest of skies at the moment (at least not in this city in Spain) but I imagine you should get some result from these in an LP area:

M13, M92, M3, M94, M29, M57.

You may also want to try your hand at these, although I haven't had much luck with my 4" combating LP and the general summer haze (am I wasting my time here?):

M51, M64, M85, M84, M86, M87.

As with splitting stars, I try to include a splitting in each observation and feel that it aids the general skill of star-hopping and reading star maps, helps one come to appreciate and recognise star magnitudes, can be conducted in most LP areas and often reveals a showcase of very pretty and vibrant stellar gems.

Clear skies and happy hunting :hello2:

Edited by Qualia
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Thanks for your anwser :hello2:

To little magnification for saturn and the moon :/ Dont know about double stars, but i imagine i'd need more magnification to split them.

I was more looking for galaxies or nebulae.

Some doubles are an 'easy' split as they are wide apart, Albireo is nice at low magnifications and has a clear difference in colour. Norton's lists the seperation of the two components so you can get a realistic idea of what you can see. Cor Caroli is another easy one, so is Mizar and Alcor [nearly directly overhead at the moment], whereas Mizar itself is a bit more difficult.

M81 & M82 should be easy enough for you and at lower magnifications you can get both in the eyepiece at the same time.

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