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Gaz15

Books

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Hi guys,

The £25 Tal is as far as I have used it a good scope, Happy Days! :(

I was wondering if anybody could recommed a good all round book that I could get to help in the beginning of my astronomy fetish.

Unfortunately there is no society near me so I am on my own to get my head around the basics and more.

Thanks

Gary

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I'd recommend Turn Left at Orion, smashing introductory book for observing and finding your way around the sky.

Chris

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Stephen O'Mearas 'Messier Objects' is a great book esp. if you like to the facts and figures behind the objects.

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Stephen O'Mearas 'Messier Objects' is a great book esp. if you like to the facts and figures behind the objects.

I'll second that. I got all 3 books in the series: Messier Objects, Caldwell Objects, Hidden Treasures. Highly recommended but they're not pocket-sized books, they're proper hardbacks.

I think it was Gaz O'C who first brought them to my attention in some other thread :D

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Gaz, "Turn left at Orion" is a great book. If you're a beginner, "Nightwatch" is also good. You might also, in departure from the thread, fancy reading the Gazza biography. :wink:

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Gaz, "Turn left at Orion" is a great book. If you're a beginner, "Nightwatch" is also good. You might also, in departure from the thread, fancy reading the Gazza biography. :wink:

At first I thought you said "Gazza autobiography" and I thought .... surely that can't be right" - then I realised you said "biography" - now it makes sense.

Tom

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Gaz, "Turn left at Orion" is a great book. If you're a beginner, "Nightwatch" is also good. You might also, in departure from the thread, fancy reading the Gazza biography. :wink:

At first I thought you said "Gazza autobiography" and I thought .... surely that can't be right" - then I realised you said "biography" - now it makes sense.

Tom

I've read Gazzas book, and while its written in the first person, I doubt he had much to do with it! :D

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I would definitely recommend "Turn Left @ Orion" too - I'm just starting out, bought that and its great. Makes it so easy to locate objects - I haven't failed to find any I've tried for yet. :wink:

Trev

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A handy book to have for both beginner and old hand alike is 'STARS over Europe' by Philippe Henarejos.

There is an introductory section on basic and practical astronomy but the bulk of the book is under the heading, Skywalking among the Stars. This is in the form of 'seasonal tours', Spring though to Winter, for both naked eye and telescopic observers. Split into subsections for each season which covers double stars,clusters,galaxies and oddities visible over that period with brief details of each subject. Each 'tour' is accompanied by an easy to follow sky route map showing the location of the listed objects of interest together with the best means of observation and ideal observation times.

Additional chapters under 'themed tours' cover the Moon, planets, asteroids and comets.

Recommended for the grab and go observer as a quick and easy reference to use for an evenings stargazing.

CW

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A handy book to have for both beginner and old hand alike is 'STARS over Europe' by Philippe Henarejos.

There is an introductory section on basic and practical astronomy but the bulk of the book is under the heading, Skywalking among the Stars. This is in the form of 'seasonal tours', Spring though to Winter, for both naked eye and telescopic observers. Split into subsections for each season which covers double stars,clusters,galaxies and oddities visible over that period with brief details of each subject. Each 'tour' is accompanied by an easy to follow sky route map showing the location of the listed objects of interest together with the best means of observation and ideal observation times.

Additional chapters under 'themed tours' cover the Moon, planets, asteroids and comets.

Recommended for the grab and go observer as a quick and easy reference to use for an evenings stargazing.

CW

CW - thanks for this reply.

I really like this forum because people really try to help newbies (like myself) but this post in particular gives some details about the book rather than just saying buy "Turn Left At Orion".

My nomination for post-of-the-week/month.

Brian.

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Hi guys,

I was wondering if anybody could recommed a good all round book that I could get to help in the beginning of my astronomy fetish. Thanks

Gary

Nightwatch is a very good starting place, with good black on white maps, and is designed primarily for finding your way visually, rather than by setting circles. It works very well for me. I also have a little book called Pocket Guide to Astronomy, by Ian Ridpath, which contains a lovely set of moon maps that you can hold in your hand and shows scads of features to entertain you for hours.

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My favourite starter book

is by Collins 'Guide to Stars & Planets'

I have the 1st & 3rd editions.

If I am in a hurry or just want to wander around the sky it is the book I use.

I would also recommend Nortons Star Atlas when you fell you are ready to get into a little more detail/tougher targets

Cheers

Ian

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Cheers for all of these suggestions, I suppose there is a different book for everyones angle on astronomy.

Thanks again

Gaz

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I also like Nightwatch.

It's the book I used the most in my backyard while learning the constellations. It also has good info on telescopes and general amateur astronomy info.

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Why not try and get some of the suggestions from the libary, then you can make up your mind as to which suits you best, only a suggestion.

naz

ps, Hows Omagh these days?

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Good suggestion, Thanks

ps, Hows Omagh these days?

Not too bad, getting dark earlier thankfully, Do you know the town?

Gaz

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