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Polarie on the way!


JB80
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Jarrod, thanks for the pic's all looking excellent what is another good point is that you are describing how these pic's was taken which as a guideline will help others and give me hope.

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No worries, the pictures aren't much but they at least show what sort of tracking I can get out of it.

I just try to explain it as I go not only for others but if I'm doing something wrong then hopefully someone can advise otherwise.

Here is a slightly better version of the last pic I posted, I'm still trying to get my head around gradient removal but I think I'm starting to get the hang of processing.

post-8383-0-24317800-1343223473_thumb.jp

Edited by Pibbles
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  • 8 months later...

As you'd expect, we're always on the lookout for stuff shot using the Polarie.

If you have a few minutes (4 and a bit in fact), this video was compiled using time lapse images taken with the Polarie:

And this seemed to me to be a pretty good solar image taken by Tom Kerss:

http://www.facebook....&type=1

Cheers, Pete

Pete

What do you use to stack them together ??? im new to this !!

Paul

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There are many ways to do it - Google for "time lapse stacking" for various tutorials. I've seen stuff on how to use Adobe Lightroom, GIMP and others. There's probably info somewhere here on SGL too.

I know that Quicktime Pro is one pretty straightforward method - you select File... Open Image Sequence and select your images and a frame rate. Provided the images are sequentially numbered, QT will do the work and then you can save a movie format.

HTH

Cheers, Pete

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No worries, the pictures aren't much but they at least show what sort of tracking I can get out of it.

I just try to explain it as I go not only for others but if I'm doing something wrong then hopefully someone can advise otherwise.

Here is a slightly better version of the last pic I posted, I'm still trying to get my head around gradient removal but I think I'm starting to get the hang of processing.

post-8383-0-24317800-1343223473_thumb.jp

There are an awful lot of blue halos on the stars. What were you using?

Did you have IR/UV Cut filters somewhere in the train?

Cheers

Stuart

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Am I the only one who read the title of this thread and thought: "Ooh hello! I'm Julian and this is my friend Sandy!"?

Hmmm. I did think: "What brings you trolling in here", but... :p

Maybe widefield VIDEO Astronomy, for those less patient? Have been dying to try out some of my old Dad's manual SLR Lenses. Those nifty little (fast) video-cam lenses give Real-time views to mag +8 seemingly? A bare lens and a tiny videocam makes (dragging out) an HEQ5 seem slight overkill too. ;)

Edited by Macavity
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  • 2 weeks later...

For some reason I didn't get the alerts that people where posting here again, sorry about that folks.

There are an awful lot of blue halos on the stars. What were you using?

Did you have IR/UV Cut filters somewhere in the train?

Cheers

Stuart

No filters or anything, it was using a cheapo 70-300mm lens and it was the first time I had used that lens in that fashion so it was more of an experimental shot.

What I think/hope is the main cause is just that the lens wasn't stopped down so I'd try it stopped down next time and then again with a LP filter. But to be honest I haven't really seen many good things said about that lens in the first place, so how much of a difference it'd make I don't know.

Edited by JB80
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