Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

lazer collimators !


knobby
 Share

Recommended Posts

Not sure where to post this but beware!

I've thought about collimating my new scope a few times so bought a Skywatcher laser collimator. Before doing this I researched it and everyone seems of the opinion that the collimator ... needs collimating.!

So before I used it I spun it round in the EP holder and sure enough it drew a 10p coin sized circle on my primary :)

So just a heads up to all fellow newbies. If you buy one check it before you spend an hour mucking your scope up.

Is it just me or do you think this is discusting? £45 for something that should be made correctly in a factory and then spending half an hour prizing locking gunk out to collimate it myself, feeling angry, must calm down ...

Edited by knobby
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed it should be returned but it's common to find this as is mentioned on this forum quite often. Go for a precision one like a Howie Glatter or a HoTech and the beam will be in good collimation but you pay for precision. You will notice that First Light Optics don't sell the cheap laser collimators - for good reason !.

Edited by John
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Far be it from me to interject again but spinning it round in the holder ? Not very precise , any laser collimator will do this even a hotech if you don't tighten it down, just the action of tightening the holder screw will throw it out as well. Again this kind of thread makes me doubt the suitability of newtonians as first scopes......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before doing this I researched it and everyone seems of the opinion that the collimator ... needs collimating.!
So before you bought it you actually knew it would need collimating, and now you complain that it needed collimating.:):icon_scratch: Edited by Capricorn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not quite ... but yes! The point is to warn others that they seem to be pretty pants and really should be checked before use.

I also think the government waste and misspend my taxes ... but I still pay them

Edited by knobby
appalling spelling :-)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would alway recommend that you check you laser colli before using, its just loke your scope, it can become miss aligned. It is pretty simple to put it right, a level flat surface and a v block. I know it is annoying you do expect it to be 100% working ready to use when you receive it.... i had to do it myself.

Only other thing is a Ho Tec colli, Ive heard great things about them.

As most other have said though, if your not happy with it send it back

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah i know what you mean i did it:), i learnt the hard way, bought one collimated it and it was worse afterwards, and i had to ask the question lol... It was rather annoying

Edited by Keiran
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a used one of these knowing that it would need collimating. Using the technique set out in the website that Glen linked to above I collimated it so that the laser spot remains more or less stationary at a distance of around 4 metres. It's actually a useful tool now, even more so when used with a barlow lens to adjust the tilt of the primary.

The other issue with the cheap units (which I've not solved yet) is that the laser beam is not very "tight" - more of a blob than a small spot of light. Thats another thing you get with the more expensive units - a better quality laser beam.

Edited by John
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a glatter , it came from the USA to the uk and it's perfectly collimated , you get what you pay for , buy a good one they cost a bit more but you only have to buy it once and it will last a long long time.

Sent from my AWSOME iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Collimation.

Ill never bother with a Newt again, no offence intended to those that love them.

Is the collimator in collimation, is the collimator sitting true in the focuser, is the focuser in collimation, is the second...... where's my refractor.... :)

Edited by Earl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure where to post this but beware!

I've thought about collimating my new scope a few times so bought a Skywatcher laser collimator. Before doing this I researched it and everyone seems of the opinion that the collimator ... needs collimating.!

So before I used it I spun it round in the EP holder and sure enough it drew a 10p coin sized circle on my primary :)

So just a heads up to all fellow newbies. If you buy one check it before you spend an hour mucking your scope up.

Is it just me or do you think this is discusting? £45 for something that should be made correctly in a factory and then spending half an hour prizing locking gunk out to collimate it myself, feeling angry, must calm down ...

This really was meant as a heads up to newbies! Thats why it was posted in 'beginers help and advice' but the mods moved it !

Interesting discussion though,

Have a good weekend all:icon_salut:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Collimation.

Ill never bother with a Newt again, no offence intended to those that love them.

Is the collimator in collimation, is the collimator sitting true in the focuser, is the focuser in collimation, is the second...... where's my refractor.... :(

Do you get spurious colours around bright objects with your fract.?

Cheeky grin!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.