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Is there a star collapsing & about to go nova?


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This guy says that the dog star is collapsing and experts believe it could go nova this year and that the event will have an apparent magnitude of -30. Wow. The problem is, I cannot find any information on what he was talking about. A news search on Sirius (if that was indeed the star he meant), just brings up reports about satellite radio. Searching for "collapsing star" only results in sports stories.

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Yeah, there's loads of stuff out on the 'net re Betelgeuse, it seems to have been doing the rounds since last year. But, what with this year being the "end of the world", it's gaining some momentum. Should still be a spectacular thing to witness though when it finally blows sometime (in the next million years).

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Yeah, there's loads of stuff out on the 'net re Betelgeuse, it seems to have been doing the rounds since last year. But, what with this year being the "end of the world", it's gaining some momentum. Should still be a spectacular thing to witness though when it finally blows sometime (in the next million years).

I cant wait for midnight 21st december so i can gloat (again) at those crazy fools.

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I cant wait for midnight 21st december so i can gloat (again) at those crazy fools.

Yeah me too, except it'll be at my end of the world 2012 party. You don't need an excuse to get drunk anymore, every kook and his dog has new theory about the end of days every other month :D

sent from Gherkin Muncher mk .III (commonly known as a Galaxy S2)

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perhaps the end of wor world will be the scene from the new star trek movie where they have to stop a collasping star form distroying earth.......

lol sorry it popped into my head and sounded right

any way, light from the stars takes hundrads of years, even millians depending on how far away they are from us (thats roughly what redshift is, so the further away it is and traveling away the more red the light reaching us is

so infact beatlejuice might have already gone nova, but we wouldnt see the light for perhaps a day, month decade, centry ect

Edited by garethmob
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This guy says that the dog star is collapsing and experts believe it could go nova this year and that the event will have an apparent magnitude of -30. Wow. The problem is, I cannot find any information on what he was talking about. A news search on Sirius (if that was indeed the star he meant), just brings up reports about satellite radio. Searching for "collapsing star" only results in sports stories.

The sun shires at magnitude -26.7 on Earth, and mag -29 on Mercury. It would indeed be troublesome if we get something shining at mag -30.

Betelgeuse is one supernova candidate, but its spin axis is pointed away from us, so we won't get the full blast of radiation. It will go supernova soon (i.e. in the next million years).

Astrophysicist use a different time scale. 'Soon' and 'just occurred' means happened in the next/last few million years, 'now' can mean currently or within a thousands of years

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The dog star is Sirius, there has been some discussion in the past as to whether it's a type 1A supernova candidate as it's a binary consisting of a main sequence star (type A1V) with a white dwarf companion. This type of supernova usually has an end sequence red supergiant with a white dwarf companion. The white dwarf has to be close enough to accrete matter from its companion, and accumulate enough mass to exceed the Chandrasekhar limit (about 1.4 solar masses) to become a supernova.

It's unlikely for two reasons, one is that the main star (Sirius) is not a red supergiant and doesn't have a sufficiently large radius to permit the white dwarf to accrete matter, the second is that they aren't close enough in orbit around each other for the process to happen anyway. Could be an interesting periodic nova rather than supernova when it reaches the end of its life but that isn't likely to be seen by any human.

Betelgeuse is a potential candidate star, but my money is on Eta Carinae - unfortunately, it's in the southern hemisphere. :D

Beware of any statements that involve "could happen this year" - well yes it could but then again it could be another million years or more. It can't be predicted that accurately.

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Did the sentence start with, 'Apparently...'?

If it did, walk away. Now...

Anyway...

Apparently, this is the year that Betelgeuse goes, and we find life (proper life - not just a speck in some primordial soup behind a Spar shop) elsewhere in the Uniblob.

Edited by SwampStar
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Did the sentence start with, 'Apparently...'?

If it did, walk away. Now...

Anyway...

Apparently, this is the year that Betelgeuse goes, and we find life (proper life - not just a speck in some primordial soup behind a Spar shop) elsewhere in the Uniblob.

Haha and apparently this was the year Tottenham would finnish above Arsenal.

Also be wary when some guy tells you something. 99 times out of 100, the "guy" is repeating something, has no in-depth knowledge of what he is talking about and is probably too lazy to check on his facts.

Although "some guy" could of been Stephen Hawkings. I wonder if he begins sentances with "apparently?"

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Haha and apparently this was the year Tottenham would finnish above Arsenal.

I'm surrounded by Tottenham fans at work which makes it even sweeter :-) St. Totteringham's day soon I hope :-)

Edited by pel
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"This guy" is just a person I met with a nice wide aperture telescope. I chanced upon while I was out stargazing myself. Other 'facts' he's told me seems off, but at least I get to peer through his scope.

Thanks for the information! If Sirius went nova, is 8.6 light years a safe enough distance?

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