Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_annual.thumb.jpg.3fc34f695a81b16210333189a3162ac7.jpg

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 25
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I use the red dot type 90% of the time. I have an optical finder I can add to my scopes when it's useful to have it.

While most red dot finders are good, there are one or two types that have a poor reputation, the ones supplied with the Celestron Astromaster scopes for example.

Edited by John
Link to post
Share on other sites

You should only have to align the finder once. From there on, unless you knock it, it should be indicating where the scope is pointing pretty accurately.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The red dot finders that come with scopes are generally awfull and every bit as bad as the old plastic finderscopes that used to be packed with them.

I use two different finders. One is a Telrad. This works like the red dot but has a clear view that doesn't dim stars. Also it has a series of circles rather than a dot, so you can see your target in the center.

I also have a 50mm Finderscope. I ould not want to be without this for the fainter more difficult targets, but for many objects just the Telrad will doo.

And yes the finder should stay alighned unless you knock it alot whilst moving the scope around.

Link to post
Share on other sites

From my own point of view I would not use an RDF unless it had a large front screen like the Telrad and Williams etc, with both eyes open you can locate your targets approximate position with the red dot, then use a 9x50 finder to find the object in question, just as described by Part Timer. I use one I acquired from the States which is similar to the Williams but without concentric rings, I think they call it The Great Mars finder, just a single dot on a large reflective screen :D

John.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't like the red-dot finder that came with my 127 Mak. The dot was just too big and too bright, even on its lowest setting. What made things worse for me was that I suffer loads of light pollution (I live near Heathrow!). The combination of an over bright dot and orange skies meant that often I couldn't find my guide stars.

I upgraded to a Rigel Quikfinder and a 9x50 finderscope. The Quikfinder projects two red circles similar to a red-dot finder, but because they are circles and the brightness can be adjusted properly, they don't obliterate my guide stars. I use this to get in the general area. I then use the 9x50 to locate the object. In dark skies, I don't usually need the finder scope as much.

I'd strongly recommend a Quikfinder as a replacement to your red-dot.

Andrew

Edited by AWR
Link to post
Share on other sites

Would definitely recommend the Telrad or the Rigel Quikfinder as a replacement for what you have. Ultimately, the best finder combination is one of the above to get you real close and a right angled optical finder to get you to the target with a a final focus at the eyepiece. Having said that, the right angled finders (which help you to avoid the inverted view) sadly aren't cheap.

Clear skies

James

Link to post
Share on other sites

I replaced the 9x50 finder on my SW 200P dob with a simple RDF which cost £25. It's mount fits into the old finder's shoe, it has a variable brightness control, and it's light enough not to cause any balance issues. Never had a problem finding a target the viewing conditions would allow me to see.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi. I have a 130 with the stock RDF (red dot finder) and I find it absolutely great and pretty easy to use. However, there were a couple of tweaks I had to make before it behaved really nicely.

1. Make sure the front edge of the RDF mount is parallel with the edge of the tube. Mine was WAY out. If not, slightly loosen the screws, realign and tighten.

2. Make sure these screws are secure (don't overtighten though)

3. Double check all the thumbscrews are nice and tight.

4. I used a couple of dabs of superglue to keep the RDF mount square with the tube once I was happy it was totally aligned.

Hope these help, I also added a pot to further reduce the brightness of the dot. And make sure you are aligned properly (loads of posts on here about that) and keep both eyes open!!!

cheers

Chris

Edited by marshy123
Link to post
Share on other sites

Never had a finderscope, but recently changed the stock rdf that came with my scope for a more reliable Baader Skysurfer III and it is excellent. Very easy to align on the scope and works a treat with the dimmer wheel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I bought my telrad I never even take the dust caps off the finder scope. It's so easy to use, and there are a lot of star maps with telrad sights on so you can position your scope easily. I haven't used any other finders so can't compare others, buti highly recommend the telrad!

Adam

Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest, I have a 9x50 finder and a red dot finder, and depsite a learning curve with the 9x50 finder, I am now 'naked' without it, as it allows me to star hop wherever I want to go, and the red dot finder only gets used once in a blue moon. However, I do admit that I used the red dot finder a lot until getting to grips with the other finder. So, if you are willing to put the work in, that would be my recommendation, though I have heard good things about a Telrad too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.