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Lockie

Chris's Obsy build

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Malc- the framing of the sheds I've looked at varies from 28x28mm to 35x35mm and they use 12mm t&g walls, ceiling, and floor plus mineral felt, which I agree isn't close to being as robust as 22mm cladding and 3"x2" framing, but I thought it might work with enough internal support with both metal and timber:( although I take on board yours and Gina's views that this won't last very long, and I would like something that will last 5-7 years so I will revisit my very first thoughts about using a metal shed as suggested by you guys, I'll see what large metal sheds are on the market, and look at ventilation, plus I'm sure painting the outside a very light colour or reflective silver might help keep them cooler, I don't want to cook my kit even though most of it is probably fourth hand:D

Edited by starfox

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Helen- I've looked at the link and he must be very happy with it if he took it all the way to Belgium with him:) metal shed option will be re investigated:D

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Something that is on my "to do" list is to plant some shrubs around my observatory - this should have the effect of "softening" it (It's a big green cube!) as well as protecting it from direct sunlight. I really must get round to it!

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Bizibilder- I enjoyed reading you blog the other day, and your obsy looks good the roof looks very smooth on the video clips:) Its good to here that you don't have issues with heat and like you say its probably down to ventilation, plus I recken the placement of the obsy is quite important and having a light colour to reflect heat, silver or white would be good:)

Edited by starfox

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Malc- the framing of the sheds I've looked at varies from 28x28mm to 35x35mm and they use 12mm t&g walls, ceiling, and floor plus mineral felt, which I agree isn't close to being as robust as 22mm cladding and 3"x2" framing, but I thought it might work with enough internal support with both metal and timber:( although I take on board yours and Gina's views that this won't last very long, and I would like something that will last 5-7 years so I will revisit my very first thoughts about using a metal shed as suggested by you guys, I'll see what large metal sheds are on the market, and look at ventilation, plus I'm sure painting the outside a very light colour or reflective silver might help keep them cooler, I don't want to cook my kit even though most of it is probably fourth hand:D

Chris, I've stated my opinion on the frames. For a 6' x 6' shed with the roof screwed to the walls, a 28mm frame is fine. But as soon as you remove the support offered by the roof it's not going to hold up. You asked for opinions on those shed, and both used 28mm frames, that's what I based my opinion on.

For metal sheds have a look at Argos Buy Metal Apex Shiplap Shed 10 x 6ft at Argos.co.uk - Your Online Shop for Metal sheds.

I think I've imputed enough into this thread already (probably sound like a stuck record :D ) but I'm looking forward to following your build which ever way it turns out

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My apologies Malc, I agree I think I've over debated this point with you, I thank you very much for your input and I appreciate the link to the metal shed:)

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I too look forward to your decision and particularly to the start of your build. I am always interested in how others make or convert sheds. Lots of pictures too please :)

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Thanks Gina- I too can't wait to make a decision, this threads getting pretty long mainly down to me and the build hasn't even started yet:o I really want to crack on and start digging the hole for the pier:D.

I had a late night researching metal sheds and their conversion and they look like a good option for strength verses cost, plus because they don't require maintenance I can squeeze a larger obsy into the same plot, with a wooden shed I was allowing 2' all the way around the obsy for a yearly coat of Cuprinol.

The link below looks like my best bet and I will hit the buy button once I've worked out the foundations for it? metal sheds tend to sit on a large slab of solid concrete which I wouldn't like at all due to how cold and damp they are plus the lack of drainage, so I need to put my thinking cap on:icon_scratch:

If I can't come up with a good enough foundation solution I will have to go against your and Malcolm's advice and buy a comercial T&G shed and try and brace it well enough to try and get 5 years life out of it:eek:

Metal Sheds - Yardmaster GEYZ Apex (280 pounds)

Edit: just found it cheaper:)

http://www.ukmetalsheds.co.uk/Sheds/Metal-Sheds/YardMaster-8x9-Metal-Shed-89GEYZ.htm?source=googlebase (257.50 pounds)

The base is 7'5"x 8'9" which I could split into a 7'5"x5'6" telescope area and a 7'5"x3'3" warm room, see below (as you can probably guess the pottery tube represents the pier) :

post-28797-133877763122_thumb.jpg

Edited by starfox

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Chris, Not sure if you are planning to do visual or imaging, but 5' 6" might be a bit tight. It would only leave 2' 3" either side of the pier. Not sure which way the roof will run off, but you could always construct or purchase a lean-too type shed and use that as the warm room, having the roof section roll over it (something like the attached sketch).

You could either leave out one of the side panels and make a door between the two rooms, or cut a hole for a window and have two access doors (metal shed and lean-too) but this would be a bit of a bind if you have to go between the two rooms.

post-23388-133877763179_thumb.jpg

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There's no need for a solid concrete base for a tin shed. You can use timber joists and T&G flooring or even exterior grade plywood. T&G flooring stands up better to damp. You can use damp proof course and/or vapour barrier to help with that.

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Hi Malcolm- 95% of the time I image now days, and I'm still on the look out for a second hand 150p to guide with my ZS66, and I'll also use my ZS for wide field work unguided, so My rig isn't going to be quite as big as yours, and for uggrades I would eventually like an 6-8" RC but these are short tube scopes so wont demand any more space:)

With this plan the roof will role off over the warm room and the 7'5" length of the telescope room runs North to South which leaves more space in the directions most used, also to make room East to West I will position the pier slightly closer to the warm room as there will be a door their which once opened will give more room, I can perhaps knock 1-2" more off the warm room I'm about as skinny as the guy from the Mr Muscle adverts:D

Oh and thanks for taking the time to do a schematic although I want to keep things as simple as possible so although its a great idea I don't think its for me, thanks though:)

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I hope you don't suffer from claustrophobia with that tiny warm room.

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Oh and thanks for taking the time to do a schematic although I want to keep things as simple as possible so although its a great idea I don't think its for me, thanks though:)

No problem... and like I've stated, everyone's needs and circumstances are different.

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Thanks Gina, I got a bit worried as all the tin shed builds I came across seemed to lay relatively big concrete foundations for them, so you think it will be ok to do something like the following after I've done the pier:

1)lay down ballast and tamper down untill the ground is hard and flat.

2)place slabs with morter around the perimeter of the obsy and level them.

3)build a 3'x2' frame out of timber with 3 coats of creo and place across the slabs with the pier tube coming up between the joists.

4)place membrane down over the pier covering the joists.

5)lay t&g floor.

6)build metal shed ontop.

7)build internal timber structure upright corner timbers concreted into the ground after being treated.

etc etc

I must admit I've skimmed walls, plumbed in bathrooms, made Aerospace components for jet fighters even, but this build has got me worried as well as excited:D

Edited by starfox

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To resolve the concrete floor problem I simply laid joists of 2"x1" (wide side down) onto a plastic membrane and laid a floor of OSB on top. On that was laid rubber matting - the interlocking type called "fatigue matting".

With a metal shed I would advise a concrete base - the shed has a metal base frame that I used. This is bolted to the concrete and, importantly, sealed with mastic to prevent water from getting under the walls. It is essential that you get the correct sealant!!! It must be the type that sticks to concrete!! Many don't. I speak from experience on that one!

For a "warm area" you could simply build a simple partition across the shed. When you open the roof it should open only far enough to keep the partitioned area covered. You will need some kind of "wall" to fill the gap between the roof and outer shed wall when the roof is open.

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hehe:) yes it would be cosy, I wouldn't have been sure a 3'3" warm room would be useable until I saw a pic of Helen's warm room which she measured at 3'2"!:) hers looks great for the space:)

Edited by starfox

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You find you have add a bit of internal bracing with a converted tin shed. Since the roof is an integral part of the strength of the structure you might need to put some 4"x2" bracing inside to maintain rigidity. The other issue with metal sheds is condensation inside, you might have to line the inside with 50mm thickness insulation board.

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Bizibilder- thanks for your advice, I need to read your blog again:) so let we get this right you laid a concrete floor, fixed the shed down with the supplied fixings, sealed it with mastic that sticks to concrete which must rule out silicon based sealant? then did you build the 2x1 joists inside the shed after laying down a membrane?

Would it be possible to sit the metal shed on a wooden joist frame, then the frame sits on slabs or blocks? so the sheds on the joists not the joists in the shed if you get what I mean? as you might have gathered building work is a first for me:)

Edited by starfox

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My floor was the last thing built and sits on a membrane. It is not part of the shed structure at all and could be lifted out (if it weren't so heavy!).

I see no reason why you could not build onto wooden joists - If building onto slabs etc you may need to make the floor joists slightly more substantial and add a few "floor supporting slabs" underneath.

With a structure that is not "sealed" you must leave some air-gaps so that any water that does get underneath (including water from the soil) can evaporate - in the same way that older houses are built with suspended floors and air bricks spaced out all around the base of the walls. There are many obsy designs around where the floor/wall joists are constructed in this way - Gina's build spring to mind.

Edited by Bizibilder

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Laser- would you say that you need to brace the inside of a metal shed as much as you need to brace the inside of a Tongue and Groove comercial wooden shed? I think I might have discussed tin sheds with you at the beginning of this thread and moved on from the idea after both what you said and my neighbour over the road sent his back due to the amount of condensation he was getting. I am definately going round in circles now but I think I've learnt a lot at least, I appreciate everyones help:).

Edited by starfox

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Chris, been searching through the threads trying to find one I remember where a guy built his observatory on a patio base using an Argos metal shed. But for the life of me can't find it. I can only guess that he's either since left the forum and the mods have done some house keeping. Anyway, i stumbled on this thread which might help you get some ideas for a cheap obsy

http://stargazerslounge.com/diy-observatories/89201-my-budget-roll-off-roof-obs-build.html

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Thanks Bizibilder, I'm thinking 3"x2" or bigger for the floor joists and if I do it this way I will take your advice and displace the weight over slabs in the centre as well as in the corners and midway between corners, thanks:)

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Thats great Malc, thanks so much I'll have a read through it now:icon_salut:

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I used 5"x2" joists at 16" centres in my floor as I recall - I think Malcolm used 6"x2" joists. Mine has 22mm thick T&G floorboards on top.

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