Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_2.thumb.jpg.72789c04780d7659f5b63ea05534a956.jpg

Which direction should I look to watch BIG BANG?


Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

New guy here (totally new for everything:- telescope, cosmology, optics, everything. Just starting to study about these things. And joined this site a week earlier.)...

And here's my first question. Please don't laugh! :headbang:

# 1. Let's say, I have a telescope which is capable of seeing 14 billion light years in time. And let's assume our universe is not expanding/stretching. so, which direction should I point my telescope to see the Big Bang??? Also assume that my telescope can see through those plasma walls... :) (remove all the obstacles).

#2. Let's say I saw the BIG BANG... ;) and still keep on observing... Will I be able to see my self ??? I know I won't live trillions of years... But just a curious question.... :(

:(

These cosmology is making me go nuts... hehe... so interesting... :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Any direction you like, it happened everywhere all at the same time.

2. Were you at the big bang? If so then Yes!

# 1. Let's say, I have a telescope which is capable of seeing 14 billion light years in time. And let's assume our universe is not expanding/stretching. so, which direction should I point my telescope to see the Big Bang??? Also assume that my telescope can see through those plasma walls... :headbang: (remove all the obstacles).

#2. Let's say I saw the BIG BANG... :) and still keep on observing... Will I be able to see my self ??? I know I won't live trillions of years... But just a curious question.... ;)

:D

Link to post
Share on other sites
please give me the link... Please please please....

what's the name of the show???

It's "Through the Wormhole" and the episode: Is there an edge to the universe?

Link to post
Share on other sites

That always confused me. If we can measure the velocity of celestial objects in the expansion of the universe, why can't we extrapolate backwards to where they all started and say "it was over there"? :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
That always confused me. If we can measure the velocity of celestial objects in the expansion of the universe, why can't we extrapolate backwards to where they all started and say "it was over there"? :D

Because everything is moving away from everything else. Space itself is expanding. Try an analogy: if I take a deflated balloon and put dots all over it with a sharpy pen, then blow it up, can you point to where the balloon "started"? No.

Link to post
Share on other sites
if I take a deflated balloon and put dots all over it with a sharpy pen, then blow it up, can you point to where the balloon "started"?

Apologies, I should have said that it used to confuse me. The balloon analogy is the way it was originally explained to me.

To my way of thinking, my original problem was that I was thinking of the universe as being a simple three-dimensional space, which of course it isn't.

Link to post
Share on other sites

EASY..... I was talking to my Grandpa at the weekend (and he is that old!!!!) and he said from where he was sitting at the time It was just off to the left a little....

Couldn't be simpler :D

Hope that helps :headbang:

Link to post
Share on other sites

The terms "big bang" and "expansion of the universe" were almost tailor-made to confuse people.

The big bang wasn't a bang and it wasn't big, it's just a mathematical extrapolation from current observations.

And the universe is not expanding, it's inflating.

Edited by themos
Link to post
Share on other sites
The terms "big bang" and "expansion of the universe" were almost tailor-made to confuse people.

The big bang wasn't a bang and it wasn't big...QUOTE]

:D Indeed, and since the phrase, coined by a sceptical Fred Hoyle, was intended to be satyrical, he would be delighted to hear you say so!!

I do like your replacement of expansion with inflation of the economic kind. It deserves a wide audience. The trouble is, we are stuck with metaphor both at the Cosmological scale and at the Quantum. Very frustrating but better than nothing. I wonder what kind of selection pressure might arise to allow us to develop an intelligence capable of directly grasping concepts outside three spacial dimensions and time. Indeed, I wonder if it has evolved somewhere else? There's a thought.

Olly

Link to post
Share on other sites
tell the the direction guys!

That's easy. Any direction and/or every direction. The furthest back we can see is to the last scattering surface which is where the light from the Cosmic Microwave Background came from. It is almost uniformly distributed (surprisingly so) around the entire sky. Into the primordial plasma we cannot see because plasma is not transparent to light but, even if it were, the answer would not change. What is difficult to swallow is that a tiny point can be 'everywhere' but that is what the BB says. 'Everywhere' was once very seriously small. This point has already been made earlier on, if I remember.

Here's a pic. http://www.google.fr/imgres?hl=en&sa=X&biw=925&bih=460&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=ry2d_uqfL9P2nM:&imgrefurl=http://cosmology.berkeley.edu/Education/CosmologyEssays/The_Cosmic_Microwave_Background.html&docid=-GWexB9Sf8QHNM&imgurl=http://cosmology.berkeley.edu/Education/CosmologyEssays/images/WMAP_skymap.jpg&w=640&h=320&ei=7JhYT6qqOca_0QXu66TJDQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=339&vpy=57&dur=2566&hovh=159&hovw=318&tx=170&ty=96&sig=113746124454039428597&page=1&tbnh=72&tbnw=143&start=0&ndsp=10&ved=1t:429,r:2,s:0

If you turn on a detuned telly some of the noise is from the CMB. The BB live on TV!

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.