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What though if you sent a spaceship in and you saw it entering the hole seemingly stuck, then you sent another one in on exactly the same course, what would you see then?

It wouldn't be a universe if there was anything else......

...or so said a 2 dimensional person who lived on a peice of paper.

Shouldn'ty have tried to read this tonight, after 1 or 2 cans of juice, it's really

confused me now :? Maybe I should leave the likes of this to Mr Hawkings, and

concentate on trying to see things with the 'scope .... But I hate it when I

can't get my head around something like this...

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What's outside our universe ?

More universe perhaps? :)

What if the universe was like a ball, you go so far in one direction that you come back to where you started? So instead of it being whats outside the universe, it would be whats inside the universe?

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If the universe is like a torus (or a inner tube) then a black hole would be

like a puncture - not good I'd imagine. Maybe the black hole just consumes

the material, converting it into energy. This seems to make more sense to

me, than there being more than one universe ("uni" as in 1 :police: ) - glad I'm

not an astrophysicist - things that are beyond my comprehension really

hurt my brain!!!!!

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  • 3 months later...

This kind of stuff gets my brain in a knot trying to figure it out...

I read an article the other night about black holes, and it mentioned how a black hole,

sucks stuff in from its accretion disk. The article said that this matter then disappeared

from the universe.

It didn't say where it went, so would this then mean that it has found a way out of the

known universe ?

See this is the issue with letting my brain go there.

Let us not forget black holes are the core of dead stars.

Do these things themselves not also die after a while?

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See this is the issue with letting my brain go there.

Let us not forget black holes are the core of dead stars.

Do these things themselves not also die after a while?

I suspect, somewhere in here...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation

is the answer? MAYBE (I haven't really read it!), Black holes were re-visited (not sic!) by the recent "Sky at Night" program. I know I probably shouldn't say this, but wasn't the Scottish Lady astronomer rather...

Oh to be young again! :love7:

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Our physics master told us that nothing in the universe 'dies' but eventually all things undergo a 'change of state'. Everything that ever was is still in existence but in a different form or 'state' nothing is 'lost' as there is nowhere else to go....... Mind you that was a long time ago when we could only afford four dimensions and Black Holes had not been invented but it still has a ring of truth about it. :wink:

CW

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Wow this is heavy man!!! :?

So what about this theorie of being able to fold part of the universe to get from A to B.

Anyone know anything about that? think I'm gonna need a bit more than 4 wheels though

and a lot more brain :wink:

Jeff.

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The interesting thing about that is ...what do they radiate and where does said radiation go?

It's not very interesting, actually, due to the no-hair theorem.

They would radiate everything that is radiatable and the radiation would go outwards from the black hole.

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This is MY understanding. The universal vacuum (space) is capable (for a limited time) of producing (spontaneously) so-called "virtual" particles e.g. electron-positron pairs etc. (Heisenberg uncertainty and all that!) When these come into contact (interact) with "real" matter these are capable of becomming physical i.e. REAL particles. In the extreme conditions e.g. the event horizon of a black hole, the "vacuum" may be literally "torn apart" into these pairs of particles etc. Of these, ONE may then be swallowed by the black hole. The OTHER (being left) emerges to wander around, [removed word]-nilly - constituting this(Hawking) radiation... :D

But then it's been a LONG time and this is now the province of younger minds.... :wink:

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Anyone heard of these boltzman brain things that randomly appear and regulate entropy (or something).

Matthew

Yes. There's supposed to be entire universes contained on the "membranes", (or "brane") traveling, mostly parallel to each other, through whatever is bigger than the universe. Sometimes, the bump into one another, creating big-bangs that add another "brane". Not sure I buy it, due to the scale necessary, but string theorists seem to like them, because they can add more dimensions to accommodate them as needed.

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Anyone heard of these boltzman brain things that randomly appear and regulate entropy (or something).

Matthew

There is an article on page 98 of this months Astronomy Now entitled 'The man with two Branes' regarding the brane theory. An amusing title but a bit too much for my single brane brain I'm afraid. As AM says it's all about three dimensional 'membranes' floating about in one dimension separated by a fourth dimensional 'gap'. :scratch: Can't make out what they are all supposed to be floating about in though. :scratch: :scratch:

CW

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