Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_6_banner_jupiter_2021.jpg.eacb9f0c2f90fdaafda890646b3fc199.jpg

 

 

Pleiades


Gonzo
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 27
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

picyure info please iso,ect thanks nice image

Filename - P1060874.jpg

Make - Panasonic

Model - DMC-GF1

Orientation - Top left

Software - GIMP 2.6.11

DateTime - 2011:11:19 23:20:25

ExifOffset - 136

ExposureTime - 4 seconds

FNumber - 0.00

ExposureProgram - Aperture priority

ISOSpeedRatings - 800

ExifVersion - 0221

DateTimeOriginal - 2011:11:19 23:46:06

DateTimeDigitized - 2011:11:19 23:46:06

ExposureBiasValue - 0.00

MaxApertureValue - F 1.00

MeteringMode - Multi-segment

LightSource - Auto

Flash - Flash not fired, compulsory flash mode

FocalLength - 0.00 mm

FlashPixVersion - 0100

ColorSpace - sRGB

InteroperabilityOffset - 7826

SensingMethod - One-chip color area sensor

FileSource - Other

ExposureMode - Auto

White Balance - Manual

FocalLengthIn35mmFilm - 0 mm

Maker Note (Vendor): -

Image Quality - Raw

Focus Mode - Manual

Faces Detected - 0

Face Info -

Thumbnail: -

Compression - 6 (JPG)

Orientation - Top left

XResolution - 180

YResolution - 180

ResolutionUnit - Inch

JpegIFOffset - 7974

JpegIFByteCount - 2486

YCbCrPositioning - Co-Sited

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

It was a Meade 32mm super Plossl in a Meade 105etx. I actually didnt bother scanning the area much just left it centered and reckon Atlas and Pleione were just out of view. They may have squeezed in if I moved the scope across a bit. Perhaps subconsciously I was telling myself I need a wide view scope like the Startravel 102 which I had been thinking about :).

G.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Meade 32mm Super plossl has a fov of 52 degrees. I'd imagine that is plenty of room to fit the whole of the group into the same fov. I'm sure that i was able to do it with a 32mm plossel that only had a 50 degree fov. IIRC it was a tight fit but possible.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Meade 32mm Super plossl has a fov of 52 degrees. I'd imagine that is plenty of room to fit the whole of the group into the same fov. I'm sure that i was able to do it with a 32mm plossel that only had a 50 degree fov. IIRC it was a tight fit but possible.

If I am right the focal length of the ETX 105 is about 1500mm. This means you have about 46.7x magnification and just 1.11 deg true FOV. My C8 equiped with a 40mm super-wide angle (Paragon) yields a 1.36 deg FOV at 50x, which can just about hold the Pleiades (with no room to spare. A 100mm F/5 travel scope with a 31mm Ultra-wide such as the Nagler would yield a 16x magnification and 5.08 deg FOV. My 80mm F/6 manages 5.3 deg FOV at 15.5x with the same EP.

Short fracs rule on these big objects!

Edited by michael.h.f.wilkinson
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LukeSW you had me worried that I may be loosing it and had the 26mm in at the time. Micheal you seem to back me up !! Anyway your both at a lower altitude than me as I'm on top of a hill therefore a bit closer so every object is going to look a bit bigger :):):)

G.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Pleiades is lovely to look at through a wiefield frac... though I managed to see the nebulosity the other week for the first time through my RC Astrograph of all things!

I like the fact that Stellarium has it listed as a nebula :-) I thought it was primarily an open cluster 'with associated nebulosity'?? :-)

Nice thing to look at either way!

Ben

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed it is. 31t5 in my Astrotech 106mm f6.5 gives a 3.6 ish degree fov. Perfect for the Pleiades. Pin sharp stars and lovely contrast mean this is my favourite way of viewing open clusters of this type.

The double cluster looks fabulous too

Cheers

Stu

Edited by BigMakStutov
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Pleiades is lovely to look at through a wiefield frac... though I managed to see the nebulosity the other week for the first time through my RC Astrograph of all things!

Often people see the nebulosity without realising it, they mistake it for flare. Wonderful target when viewed through a widefield refractor. Interestingly when observing Pleiades it appears cultures around the world all independently created stories about them that included a number of women, like the Seven Sisters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't go for a 40mm Plossl. Once you get beyond 25mm the 1.25" eyepiece barrel starts to restrict the view. A 40mm would give you the same FOV as a 32mm, though the object would appear smaller. This is why eyepieces like the 24mm Televue Panoptic and Baader Hyperion are so popular, they give you the widest FOV available from a 1.25" barrel. It might sound strange but a 24mm Hyperion, 32mm Plossl and 40mm Plossl will cover almost precisely the same area of sky.

HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the Hyperion Zoom but I still can't see the full Pleiades with it at 24mm which is why I wanted to try something different. Although I haven't tried the 90mm frac out yet, the viws with that might be better.

Edited by Pibbles
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.