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blusky

Is it a star that for the 2nd night pretends to be another Galilean moon

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Depends, there is a star in that area apparently. However, a guy posted an animation on here yesterday showing a 5th moon moving over 15mins. So there is one there, but whether you see it or not is a mystery :)

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It's just a star. In its motion through the sky, Jupiter regularly passes close to many stars, which sometimes line up to look like another moon. None of the non-Galilean moons are bright enough to be seen as anything but a very faint object even in large scopes.

Edited by lukebl

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best way to tell is make a sketch (only rough) of where the 'moons' are. after half an hour or so do another one and the ones that move in relation to the main planet are moons and the ones that don't are stars.

Edited by Moonshane

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yes I noticed it also I was asking others if they could see it , good Idea about the drawings I will start doing that :)

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hey, if it's good enough for Galileo......

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It got me too, I checked it out on Stellarium and it's a star: HIP9569

Info from here

HIP: 9569

Henry Draper: 12512

Right Ascension: 2.04932381h

Declination: +11.01875980°

Distance: 665.714285714 light years

Magnitude: 6.53

Absolute Magnitude: -0.01901959985

Spectral Class: K0

Color Index: 1.297

Surface Temperature: 3500-5000 K

Luminosity: 3.09281e+28

Known Planets: none

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I saw it as well last night, being a newbie and spending most of the last month looking at Jupiter I couldn't work out how I'd missed it before. It did look like another moon though.

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I concur, it is the star Hip 9569. Almathea is the next biggest moon, close in on the left, but doubt we saw it the other night, though there is a lot of interest around it, did we see it or didn't we?

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Yeah, I noticed it a few nights ago. Was further than the moons get then though, so no real confusion for me.

Also, "That's no moon."

Edited by cantab

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None of the non-Galilean moons are bright enough to be seen as anything but a very faint object even in large scopes.

Wouldn't agree with this as I can see 3 and sometimes 4 of the moons around Jupiter in 8x42 binoculars.

42mm isn't a very large scope and in a small 70mm scope the moons are all very visible, Io stood out from the other 3 as it was much brighter last time I looked, again 70mm is not a very large scope.

Edited by ronin

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He said the non-Galilean moons, ie ones that aren't Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Those four are 5th and 6th magnitude. The next-largest moon of Jupiter, Amalthea, is 14th magnitude.

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i thought from the video i posted it was obvious

u see jupiter

3 moons and a star

obv it is a star as it twinkles and yes stellarium said it was HIP9569

what more evidence do we need ?????????????

Edited by pelpa666

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i thought from the video i posted it was obvious

u see jupiter

3 moons and a star

obv it is a star as it twinkles and yes stellarium said it was HIP9569

what more evidence do we need ?????????????

Nuff said. Obviously a star. Topic archived.

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Isn't stellarium fantastic!

Every amateur astronomers essential companion.

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Ive seen it too. collimate my bins and used jupiter as a reference. i saw 5 moons and thought id not collimated my bins properly. i had to get my scope out and double check.

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Yeah, I noticed it a few nights ago. Was further than the moons get then though, so no real confusion for me.

Also, "That's no moon."

I have a very bad feeling about this...

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