Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

michael.h.f.wilkinson

Poll: who uses goto/star hopping

What do you use to find stuff in the sky?  

115 members have voted

  1. 1. What do you use to find stuff in the sky?

    • Go To
      44
    • Star hopping
      39
    • Mixture
      28
    • Nothing, I cannot find ANYTHING up there ;)
      4


Recommended Posts

I prefer the simple approach so star hop with my dobs and small frac; I am not a fan of wires and screens everywhere. I recently used 'push to' on another scope which really was very good. I personally enjoy the challenge though of finding things 'myself'. Obviously I accept that I am using other people's discoveries and books etc though.

For me (as an ex birdwatcher) I'd compare the pleasure of finding a scarce bird on your local patch to star hopping and GOTO as 'twitching' a rare bird that someone else has found distantly; not a perfect analogy, I realise. I always got more satisfaction from the former.

All that said, 'vive la difference'!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use an Intelliscope to push-to! A pda sized bit of kit attached to my 10" dobsonian that helps me find the DSO's. The mini dob was star hopping, but slowly as I am learning to find my way around the sky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Star hopping for me, very satisfying as the object glides into view.

But I say relax and do astronomy your way.

Regards, Ed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit of both - but mostly GOTO...

But earned my stripes star hopping....from the days when GOTO never existed :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Star hopping with my 4" refractor on an AZ4 and goto for my other scopes. I enjoy them both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well i have never had the luxury of a GoTo so have always had to starhop... except the other night when looking for the comet garradd,, I ended up ringing an astro friend to confirm its whereabouts and then when i had found it..I smsd her to make sure it was the comet i was seeing.... she texted back confirming that this little greyish blob was the comet. "You can call me your friendly GOTO" if you lke! " she joked. thats teh lovely thing about observing at the obserbatory together with the rest of the gang. We all help each other and its always a very good uplifting experience!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thats teh lovely thing about observing at the obserbatory together with the rest of the gang. We all help each other and its always a very good uplifting experience!

I agree, is always interesting to get another opinion on the subject on view :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Star hopping for me.

It's fun (you don't always find what your'e looking for, but you see a lot more of the scenery!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i use goto if and when possible, but make sure after i find the object i take a look at where in the sky it is and what the star field is in the finder scope. that way i have been able to learn and pass the knowledge on in observing session to people without goto. i don't always succeed though so for me got to is a tool that i have so i use it. to me it is more about knowing what is in an area of sky or constellation. a go to is great but if the object is below the horizon you aint going to see it. so even with goto it is Homework first before i go out. and over the years i have found that the time needed prior to observing has become less and less.

Grahame

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[i use my setting circle] ... surely I can't be alone?
Nope. There is the popularity of Azimuth scale + Wixey re. Dobs. Assumes availability of a computer. I also used that idea on a GIRO III / ST102 - No problem getting stuff into (at least) a finder field, with "One-star" alignment. Equatorial setting circles (RA) require a bit more "thought" [here!]? But I see no fundamental objection. :) Edited by Macavity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nope. There is the popularity of Azimuth scales + Wixey (digital level). Assumes availability of a computer, But I used that idea on a GIRO III too - No problem getting stuff into (at least) a finder field. Equatorial setting circles (RA) require a bit more "thought" [imo], but I see no fundamental objection. :)

I can set my RA scale correctly, using the instructions that came with the GP mount, but I tend not to use it. I do see the poll should have been more elaborate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find the EQ setting cirle a doddle using stellarium. point at a known star, set your RA and DEC according to the figures shown in stellarium, click what you want to look at in stellarium and then move the scope to the required coordinates. Really it is just non computerised goto. I use as wide EP as possible and sometimes have to spiral around a bit to find the object but really it is not so diffcult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I find the EQ setting cirle a doddle using stellarium. point at a known star, set your RA and DEC according to the figures shown in stellarium, click what you want to look at in stellarium and then move the scope to the required coordinates. Really it is just non computerised goto. I use as wide EP as possible and sometimes have to spiral around a bit to find the object but really it is not so diffcult.

You must have better setting circles than my old GP mount. Its RA scale easily shifts position if you touch it. No digital read-out either :). Newer scopes with more robust or even digital setting circles should be fine. When I did my BSc work with the 1.5m Arcetri telescope at Gornergrat, I also just tapped in coordinates, and he presto, you got your target, but my old mount does not support this.

On the plus side I have not had to recharge my (17Ah) power tank yet, and I have had it for 5 months or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an HEQ5 at present and previously an EQ5. Once you dial in the RA and DEC you can tighten them with a screw so they won't shift out of alignment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have an HEQ5 at present and previously an EQ5. Once you dial in the RA and DEC you can tighten them with a screw so they won't shift out of alignment.

Similar to the GP, but said screw tends to loosen during the session :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use (a) star hopping + "visual patterns" (based on the charts in Uranometria 2000 or Stellarium) or (:) setting circles (SuperPolaris), setting them on the nearest clearly id'd star. The RA setting doesn't appear to slip in RA as I move the axis.

Chris

Edited by chiltonstar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I confess to being a bit of a control freak in my dealings with mechanical devices (still rely on maps and roadsigns even when I have the satnav on...) and thus star hopping is definitely more my thing... after all how would I actually know the goto had sent me to the right object... ;-)

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the GOTO method, it would be nice to star hop to objects but my eyes are not that good these days. I have had objects in the view finder and not known it until a friend has told me. Oh a wish for some new eyes.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
after all how would I actually know the goto had sent me to the right object... ;-)

good point you raise, when first using a go to it can take some time to familiarise yourself with the night sky and thus know that it is moving to the position of the target selected, of course if you have set its alignment objects correctly all should be fine for it to move accordingly, its then up to you to learn about the subject you are observing, I used a planisphere, astronomy magazines/books, went to a few of the local astronomy society's etc.

It all helped me to find my way so now then I select something with my scope I have a fair idea, most times, where it will end up pointing and what I should be expecting to see when I have a look at it, I am always standing behind it when I select a target and checking that knowledge and whether or not I am right with my own rough co-ordinates.

Of course now we can use software like Stellarium to use as another option for double checking our targets for the night.

Just have a try, good luck with it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I tried GOTO (Synscan) for the first time - I can find the blooming objects a lot faster (AND QUIETER!) manually. Not happy. :)

The above sentence must seem strange to those who have used automated scopes, but you have to remember I have always used manual mounts to align my telescopes. (I'm an observer)

Perhaps I'm just an old fart...:D

Edited by Beulah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.