Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

New Supernova in Messier 101


PaulB
 Share

Recommended Posts

Michael & John > re magnitude limits.

I had a brief view this evening with the new scope, see my thread in the 'Lounge', and one of the easy ref. stars that I sketched near the Ring Nebula is (overhead) 10.3m in Stellarium, so with a more practiced eye and good conditions the Sn may still be within my grasp !

cheers,

Malcolm.

It is low in the sky, so look for a dark site. Best of luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 171
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Ugh!!! Got out there last night. All two tons of equipment was set up. The sky had many high clouds with some fairly clear spots near the handle of the Big Dipper.

Unfortunately, the humidity was rising fast and everything was more than soaked. Thank goodness for my dew zappers on objectives and at the eyepiece.

Due to the light pollution in my NW even M101 was a great challenge. Things would have been different, but for the humidity.

After losing M101 and the SN a couple of times, I called it a night and went with whatever my DSC and DSLR had captured in my two hour session. There was nothing on either camera worth showing here, but I did get enough images to estimate 2011fe's magnitude: a healthy 10.4!

This information made my efforts worth all the frustration! I expected the SN to be much dimmer by now but I'm happy to report it can still be reached by modest equipment (even under horrible conditions).

Bill

Edited by wcgucfa
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Michael,

Last night (9/26) I used my Antares 152mm refractor.

I compared the image star field with my mapping program field.

I use SkyMap Pro, v. 10. Swear by it, actually.

Even though the magnitude is holding somewhat, the target is

sinking lower and lower each night as you know.

But would it be as much fun without the challenge?:p

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Michael,

Last night (9/26) I used my Antares 152mm refractor.

I compared the image star field with my mapping program field.

I use SkyMap Pro, v. 10. Swear by it, actually.

Even though the magnitude is holding somewhat, the target is

sinking lower and lower each night as you know.

But would it be as much fun without the challenge?:p

Bill

Precisely! I am going to give it another try this evening, as the weather promises to be very good this time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a better night - less haze. In comparison to the 10.4 star i would estimate The SN to be around mag 10.8 - with the low altitude i think i may start to struggle much below 11 mag. with the 4".

andrew

Edited by andrew63
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good going guys! Wow, it seems to be dropping in magnitude pretty fast.

I'm hoping to catch it around 13th mag when it nearly matches the 13 and

14 mag stars on either side of it shown in photo below taken on Sept. 9.

It was then near 10th mag. My fear is that by the time it reaches 13, it will

be too low to image.

Bill

sn2011attendantscrop034.jpg

Edited by wcgucfa
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I looked each night last week with my 15x70s, and I could not see it visually although M101 was fairly obvious (from a very dark site in C. France). I had seen it with the same binos at the beginning of September, and it was fairly easy to see, even when M101 wasn't visible.

Interestingly enough, I took a series of images with my DSLR with a 300mm prime lens on 26th Sept, 20.45 UT (ISO 6400, 5 secs, no tracking, 7 exposures stacked in DSS) and even though the SN wasn't visible to the naked eye, it is very clear on the images, together with the core of M101 and a hint of the spiral structure.

Chris

Edited by chiltonstar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I looked each night last week with my 15x70s, and I could not see it visually although M101 was fairly obvious (from a very dark site in C. France). I had seen it with the same binos at the beginning of September, and it was fairly easy to see, even when M101 wasn't visible.

Interestingly enough, I took a series of images with my DSLR with a 300mm prime lens on 28th Sept (ISO 6400, 5 secs, no tracking, 7 exposures stacked in DSS) and even though the SN wasn't visible to the naked eye, it is very clear on the images, together with the core of M101 and a hint of the spiral structure.

Chris

Interesting. Could you post those images?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to agree, that is a very good image!

It is the best one I have seen so far with which to compare with what I have been seing in my scope. Turning it upside down it is pretty much my field-of-view when using my 32mm EP. I have never managed to actually see M101 due to my light pollution, but is is showing that I have been looking at the right place and have indeed seen the supernova.

dag123

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello everyone,

After 16 nights of cloud cover, I also got out to see how the SN and Garradd were doing (Oct 5). The sky was not the best with light pollution in the NW

and M101/2011fe low on the horizon, and a bright waxing moon.

Enough excuses!

Clear skies,

Bill

SN 2011fe and M101's core are just visible near center. The SN is still

the brighter of the two. SN mag. is near 11, in agreement with Michael.

Sony Cybershot DSC F-707. 30 seconds. 25x. Antares 152mm. ISO 400.

Core is at 11:00 positition from SN.

dsc00211xb.jpg

Here's a close-up with the Canon T1i. Apologies for the size, having trouble editing images in this forum, for some reason.

Antares 152mm, afocal through a 30mm EP. 66 seconds single frame. ISO 1600. Galaxy core in upper left corner.

sn2011fe0387oct52011.jpg

A peek at Garradd before ending my observing session. Sony, 25 second single frame. ISO 400. Afocal. Antares. 25x.

garradd00217oct52011.jpg

Edited by wcgucfa
Quality
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had a look for SN tonight but no trace now with my 4" - last saw about a week ago when about mag. 11. So it's up do you guys was larger equipment to chart it's decline!

Still it's been a great thrill to see something that has been so spectacular an event in a small telescope.

andrew.

Edited by andrew63
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Guys,

After checking out my images of 10/5 (above) and doing a comparison star check, I couldn't

get it any lower in magnitude than 11.2-3. One reliable site had it listed at 11.8 (?). Maybe I'm

losing my observational touch!

Oh well, we've got clear skies forecast for tonight. We'll see what's going on.

Sad that as the SN grows dimmer and closer to the horizon, the Moon grows brighter!

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.