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North America Nebula


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My site isn't really polluted (I can see the Cygnus Rift very well) but it's not perfect. I was getting a field of view of about 1 degree - that's probably too narrow, come to think of it. Well, I'll keep looking!

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I tried for this target last night with a 10inch dob, from my site near the edge of a town, so moderate LP, I easily picked out the cluster ngc6996 in the middle of it, but no nebulosity, even with a UHC filter. I had similar lack of results trying for the veil nebula too.

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Hi

The NA nebula is a huge faint object that requires ink lack skies and a RFT or bins to see it.

Large apertures are not much help with it. Leave your 10" scope and have a bash with your bins from a dark sky.

Regards Steve

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I agree with swamp thing, regarding the narrow FOV. The best views i've had of NGC 7000 have been with a 66 sd and a 22mm panoptic and UHC filter which gives almost a 4 degree TFOV and nicely frames the whole nebula. It is only a very subtle brightening and so being able to see all of it with some space to spare really helps you see it! The west coast around california and mexico are the brightest parts and i would imagine your 10" dob gives to much magnification. I agree with swamp thing ditch the dob and reach for some binos or a rich field scope to get the best views.

Cheers

Adam

Edited by adam88
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  • 2 weeks later...

I agree with Adam. I did not really think it was possible visually until I was at the Kelling Heath Autumn Star party last year. I had excellent views of it through my 80mm equinox using a 40mm 2" eyeoiece and a UHC filter. I could just about trace the whole outline and there was definite brightening around the central america/wall area.

Keep having a go but I think a filter is essential and a widefield refractor/bins are the best instruments.

thanks

Jonathan

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Unfortunately, when Michael called in at my place it was nearly full moon otherwise I'd have asked for his help because I have a stunning site and a shedload of toys, and... can I see this devil? No!! I've seen the Horsehead, for goodness sake!

Mind you, a quick tour of the sky with Michael made one thing very clear; he's awfully good.

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
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I was out on Dartmoor a few weeks ago doing a wide-field image of this region and with Deneb directly overhead, could just about make it out with the naked eye.

My eyes were well adjusted at this point, the crescent moon was nowhere to be seen and it was exceptionally clear. I think the altitude of 1000ft above sea level certainly helped as well.

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I was out on Dartmoor a few weeks ago doing a wide-field image of this region and with Deneb directly overhead, could just about make it out with the naked eye.

My eyes were well adjusted at this point, the crescent moon was nowhere to be seen and it was exceptionally clear. I think the altitude of 1000ft above sea level certainly helped as well.

From Orpierre in France (800 m above sea level) I could see a haze near Deneb in just the right spot, but I could not say whether that was the nebula or just a bright patch in the Milky Way. Whatever Olly says about my skills, I only got the North America Nebula last year, after some thirty years of observing, and the Pelican this year. Clearly, they are difficult objects, requiring really dark skies and a good wide-field scope.

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I had the same problem monday night trying to find ngc7000.

My goto was a little off at the time so I'm not sure I was in the correct place anyway :)

I could see thousands of stars so I assumed I was nearby and I had my UHC filter in.

Is there a nearby star I can synchronize on to get better accuracy?

I'll persevere though because it's one I really want to see.

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I had the same problem monday night trying to find ngc7000.

My goto was a little off at the time so I'm not sure I was in the correct place anyway :)

I could see thousands of stars so I assumed I was nearby and I had my UHC filter in.

Is there a nearby star I can synchronize on to get better accuracy?

I'll persevere though because it's one I really want to see.

Deneb is nearby, but near zenith it may not help. I suggest you look through the ST80, rather than the 6SE, as the latter is too restricted in terms of FOV. NGC 7000 is a few degrees across.

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I had the same problem monday night trying to find ngc7000.

You will not see it when the Moon is that bright. Even a half moon will wash it out.

As I said "Ink Black skies"

I have tried with the dob and 20x80's but I cannot see it....despite relatively good skies..
Mark.

You should see it with the 20x80's but relatively good skies may not be enough. Take your bins way out into the country for a real chance.

Regards Steve

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Forgot to look on Sunday night because I was too busy with comet Garradd! The skies were really clear and dark though (the Milky Way went all the way to the horizon with the naked eye) so I guess I've got the right conditions at the moment.

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I've adjusted one of the single imaging subs from the night at Dartmoor to give you a rough indication of how it appeared visually to my eyes. The dust clouds on the left-hand side of the frame were very striking as they appeared much darker than the surrounding night sky and were almost inky black.

post-26298-133877650946_thumb.jpg

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I have just checked my Sky Atlas 2000.0, and measured up the North America Nebula with the 4 degree Telrad circle. It shows you need 4 degrees to frame NGC 7000 and the Pelican properly. This tallies with my experience with the 80 mm in Orpierre, in which the 22 Nagler with 3.76 deg FOV framed only NGC 7000, but the Paragon 40 at 5.6 framed both.

Using the 4.4 degree FOV of the 15x70 bins, if you but Deneb on one side of the FOV, and 62 (zeta) Cygni diametrically opposed on the other edge, both are in the FOV NGC 7000 on the half of the FOV towards zeta Cygni, whereas the Pelican is towards Deneb.

I never spotted the Pelican through bins though, only with the 80 mm with UHC filter.

Edited by michael.h.f.wilkinson
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  • 11 months later...

All these comments have cheered me up. Its not necessarily my lack of observational ability! I've tried to see this nebula with two different scopes and 11x80 tripod mounted bins. Now the Council turn the street-lights out after midnight its pretty dark from my backyard, but still no joy. I had all but given up, but now I shall keep on trying. Thanks to all.

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