Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

Who has naked eye Milky Way?


Earl
 Share

Do you have Clear visable Milky Way?  

101 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you have Clear visable Milky Way?

    • Yes all the time
      30
    • Iffy to ok
      38
    • Milky way? thats a choccy bar?
      33


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 52
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

On good nights I can clearly see the milky way and the dark rifts in it from my back garden in North Somerset with the naked eye. Under the same conditions M31 is just visible to the naked eye as an elongated misty patch.

With Bristol and Cardiff / Newport either side of me the seeing quickly deteriorates as I get much below 45 degrees altitude though.

Edited by John
Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi there , i can see the milky way from my back garden , like a fuzzy haze with some more vivid stars in the midst of the hazy light , but i have spent many nights in the highlands , climbing and hillwalking ,camping ,bivvying and staying in bothys in remote areas , ben alder bothy being a memorable night last august ,no moon just a carpet of stars in the heavens , and the milky way a ribbon of magic light , or camping on the princes beach in eriskay in the westen isles , in june , i think you would be hard pressed to find a better place to see the milky way . :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On nights with "average" seeing I can pick out the milky way fairly easily. On good nights it's very clear down to about fifteen degrees above the horizon in either direction, I'd say.

James

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When Vega is close to directly above as it is now I can just about make out the Mg 4.3 stars around it. Under those conditions There is just a wisp of the Milky Way through Cygnus which is also near the zenith.

Any lower and the light pollution masks any hint of the MW.

If I'm incredibly lucky, the sky (later in the night or later in the year, when it's overhead) I can just about discern the two guide stars to M31 but the galaxy itself is just too faint.

Typically my Sky Quality Meter reads 19.8 at the zenith, but that's not dark enough to see Andromeda naked-eye. Even though that SQM reading translates to about a VLM of 5.3, in practice those calculations just don't match my eyes :)

Edited by pete_l
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just about from my garden in Crewe, I can make it out as a hazy band across the sky on a dark and clear night. I can also just manage M31 naked eye in similar conditions.

I only live in Congleton and I don't recall ever seeing it... Although now I know there's the possibility I'll be concentrating a lot more!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not that long ago I had a good view of MW on a good clear night but now with some additional local lighting it's a bit of a sore point. Sometimes I think I can make something out but Its probably wishful :) thinking.

Edited by Multi-Coated
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not as good as at star parties but can see it sometimes, maybe it's easier to spot it having seen it more clearly in dark skies.

Edited by Luke
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On a good night with no moon the MW is faintly visible from my garden, and the darker rift through Cygnus. As posted above, it's bigger / wider than I imagine it. I spent a wonderful hour last week lying on the trampoline just staring up at it. I started out with the bins, but it was such a good night that I 'upgraded' to eyeballs :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favourite astronomical moments was when I was moving house last winter. I was ferrying some stuff over to my current house on a clear night, tired as hell. Stepped out of the car, just about mustered myself to lift some boxes, looked up and there was the Milky Way, straight off the bat.

I consider myself to be very lucky indeed to have the skies that I do, even thought objectively they're not a patch on somewhere like Galloway, however on reflection there's no reason why everyone shouldn't be able to enjoy our night skies to their full extent with proper planning and lighting design.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The MW is reasonably visible from about 35-40+/- degrees in both directions in my back yard. Many constellations are also visible and the entire Little Dipper can be viewed with some effort and after some adjustment from being inside. I can usually get the 4 brightest stars right off, but the last 3 take a little time for the eyes to get adjusted, especially the last one in the cup of the dipper itself (SAO 8470).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.