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DSLR Imaging Planets?


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Hi all,

Is it possible to take images of Saturn for example by taking lots of short exposures pics with my DSLR and then stacking them? Im not set up for webcam photography just yet so want to try with my DSLR.

Also are there any tutorials for Registax, im struggling with the basics!

Thanks

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i guess if you took enough frames then it would be ok.

use deep sky stacker to stack image files. use registax to turn avi files into a stacked image.

youtube regstax tutorials. regsitax 6 is mnore confusing than 5 i find, so use 5 if you can. most of it is intuitive, but the one bit u might get stuck on is the level adjusters, but theres a few on youtube, and no doubt alot of help in th e imaging tutorials here as well

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It is possible - see this:

digz-albums-solar-system-picture6303-dsc6156.jpg

This was taken at 1/40s ISO 400 on my 250p DX with a 2x Barlow. It is heavily cropped which is where webcams come in use. They have a small FOV and thus the object will look bigger (apparently speaking).

I guess if your DSLR can record video then you can make an AVI to run through Registax, but again with the big sensor of a DSLR you will find it will require cropping.

use deep sky stacker to stack image files. use registax to turn avi files into a stacked image.

I think Registax is more suited to planetary imaging rather than DSS, that is more aimed at DSO work.

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I agree, DSS won't really do planets. Registax will work with DSLR jpg files as well as AVI's. I've done plenty of lunar and white-light solar images that way, and the Registax wavelet filters really allow you to bring up a lot of detail.

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This is the best I could manage with a 130P and a DSLR. I think it was ISO 1600 at 1/20s using eye-piece projection with a 10mm lens.. and then about 250 frames stacked together in Lynkeos.

saturn___cassini___1675_by_blackparticle-d3ficie.jpg

I then tried the webcam option and won't be pointing my DSLR at planets again. It was good practice though and taught me a lot about stacking / deconvolution and wavelet processing. :)

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I think Registax is more suited to planetary imaging rather than DSS, that is more aimed at DSO work.

my bad - sorry i ignorantly assumed it only processed avi's since thats all ive used it for.

can i ask why dss wouldnt suit planetary images tho? is it because registax has an easier-to-use level adjuster for shaprness etc?

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can i ask why dss wouldnt suit planetary images tho? is it because registax has an easier-to-use level adjuster for shaprness etc?

TBH Im not sure.

I know Registax will stack avi's which seems to be the preferred solution for planetary imaging to yield the best results. i.e. taking 100s and 100s of short exposures in AVI format to allow bad data due to seeing variances to be ditched etc. DSS wont do this.

I guess DSS is more aimed at deep sky imaging (hence its name) and is specifically written for this application whereas Registax isnt, i.e. i think it can be used for both but, from what I gather, the wavelets are a good piece of script for sharpening planetary (and lunar) images and it seems to be better suited for this application.

Im not really an expert, but this is just my thoughts :)

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DSS searches for stars to use for aligning the frames. Registax does it differently but I'm not sure of exactly how it does it. DSS = Deep Sky Stacker and that's what it does.

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The skywatcher 'deluxe' ;) barlow has a T-thread at the top. You screw a T-ring to this which then fits to the DSLR camera body in place of a lens. It is not usually worth actually doing this.

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