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Trouble with M53


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I've been a little bit frustrated the past few evenings as I've been unable to locate M53, which I'm expecting to see as a fuzzy blob and given the time I've spent looking at that space of sky even the faintest blob I would have turned over if visible :hello2:.

But after looking for it for so long, without success I'm starting to think will my skies and scope are not gathering enough light to see this? I have looked on need-less light pollution which gives you an indicator of the skies limiting magnitude for which I was given the reading 4.37, and about 1/5 *s, does this sounds fairly accurate for a suburban area? :)

Maybe I need to start from the brightest Messier objects, would this be a wise move?

Any recommendations on the easier/brighter Messiers that would be viewable as a back garden observer?

Thanks :)

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I find almost all galaxies to be totally invisible from my urban garden. This is why almost all my DSO nights are spent with a DSLR. Any chance of getting to a dark site? I'm sure that would make many of them visible (as faint fuzzy patches) to your scope.

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Many thanks for your reply DP, unfortunately the furthest I can reach (Which I believe isn't far enough) would be by bicycle (I don't drive MEH!), carrying the stuff which isn't a problem, just don't know anywhere dark sites close enough to myself (Fairly central Leicester). I will maybe try at this weekend a darkish spot I know of, which looks abit better than my view from my garden.

I'm starting to wonder if it would be worth trying to establish my limiting magnitude with this scope and my skies, by trying something like working from the brightest to the invisible of the Messiers?

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Thanks for your reply nightvision, so I have pretty much no hope for M53, if you struggle with the 12" beast :) Well I guess I'll start off with the brighter ones and work my way down until I find they are invisible will give me a number for limited magnitude, this might mean I'll spend observations looking for objects I can actually see hehe! :(

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My NexStar 6SE found M53 a few nights ago and I've seen it for the first time (that is if it wasn't NGC 5053 which is also very nearby). Anyway I've seen that M53 has a smaller apparent magnitude than the other one so I think it was it. I was observing under a light polluted sky and it appeared like a faint fuzzy patch.

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Many thanks for your reply DP, unfortunately the furthest I can reach (Which I believe isn't far enough) would be by bicycle (I don't drive MEH!), carrying the stuff which isn't a problem, just don't know anywhere dark sites close enough to myself (Fairly central Leicester). I will maybe try at this weekend a darkish spot I know of, which looks abit better than my view from my garden.

I'm starting to wonder if it would be worth trying to establish my limiting magnitude with this scope and my skies, by trying something like working from the brightest to the invisible of the Messiers?

Hi Karlos there's a couple of us from stargazers go to a place out near kibworth it's quite dark there. If you like i could pick you up when we go. I live near aylestone are you far from there. if its clear we will be going there next weekend.

Let me know if your interested

steve

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