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another shooting star past saturn


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:) ive been observing since november ish, and whilst i have seen a fquite a few shooting stars with the naked eye, ive rarely seen any in the ep - well i posted sometime last week about seeing an asteroid fly past saturn whilst looking through a 6mm planetary. tonight was the first night for a while without cloud, so out comes the scope. ten minutes of observing later, another shooting star flys right past saturn, through the whole fov, this time with a 5mm - still warm inside from the last sighting, i quickly looked up with naked eyes to see if i could see it; i couldnt - is this becaue of the terrible light pollution in my part of reading, or because it wasnt bright enough to ever be seen witht he naked eye?

was at 10.49pm wednesday night 1st june incase anyone else spotted this! ive sene it twice now, i feel so lucky :):D:D

so it got me thinking - this might be a silyl quesiton but - is there a large number of these things flying around all over the place? like, a big big number's worth, and so therefore quite likely such a view will happen every now n then?

second, since they are so small, how do we see them at all? do we only see the ones that burn up in our outer atmosphere?

tom

Edited by chemtom24
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I saw one a couple of weeks ago, I think it was identified as a russian satellite? Perhaps check at heavens-above to see if there were any orbiters going around at that time?

I'd love to know for sure.

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im lokng on heavens avbove, ive picked my locaiton from the map but i cnt see where to look for last nights 'events' so to speak! any help? im frm reading, uk.

*EDIT* got it, just searching now. will check co-ords with stellarium nd let u know!

Edited by chemtom24
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i may of course be wrong, but checking the image i saw of saturn and its two main stars with the stellarium image, i gather my telescope gives me an upside down image. therefore what i thoguht was south was north etc.

so knowing this, i *think* what i saw was the seasat1

its timing and direction make it the only suspect in the lineup, so i think this one is solved!

SeaSat 12.522:53:2110°NNE 22:58:2287°WNW 23:03:1810°SW

Edited by chemtom24
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to moonmonkey and the rest - i dont know why but i find it very fascinating that others saw the same thing. reckon its cos its such a small chanced thing to happen, and therefore knowing that someone else was watching saturn at exactly the same i was, give or take light speed/distance difference between us.

Anyway since this is the second ive seen in the scope, and perhaps another 5/6 with naked eye, i have decided to keep a log of each 'thing' i see and see if i can work out what it was from heavens above etc.

clear skies in reading, hell yea!!! :)

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to moonmonkey and the rest - i dont know why but i find it very fascinating that others saw the same thing. reckon its cos its such a small chanced thing to happen, and therefore knowing that someone else was watching saturn at exactly the same i was, give or take light speed/distance difference between us

I have to say thats what freaks me out as well :hello2: and its just the few that read the threads as well .... so over all there were possibly hundreds of people saw the same :) bit of an eye opener really :)

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