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Solar film: off axis or full aperture?


Full aperture or Off axis filter?  

7 members have voted

  1. 1. Full aperture or Off axis filter?

    • Full aperture
      6
    • Off axis
      1


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Hello,

I know there have been a lot off threads asking about Baader solar film but I feel that there have been mixed responses.

I have a 5 inch reflector. Would it be best to have a full aperture filter of an off axis (smaller) filter?

I just want a definite answer. I also do not want to waste the film as you only get one sheet and I may want to use it for other stuff (binoculars, another scope)

Thank you.

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I made an off axis 70mm cutout for my 150P. I get really nice results and good resolution. Better resolution than the full aperture version I made for my Skymax 127. All the affordable solar scopes are in the 35 - 90mm range. The sun is so bright, you don't need more than that.

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Edited by RikM
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I am no expert but all means put the film on the tube!!!

My 114/900 was delivered with solar film attached to the small cover hole of the tube's front cover. I've observed the sun that way and the results were quite remarkable. Waiting on the new lens kit to try it now with the filters.

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sorry to jump in but can you tell me please does the film go on the end of the tube or on the lense ?thankyou

Absolutely the front.

Think of it this way: you filter the light (and heat) BEFORE you start focussing it onto a point.

If you do it the other way round (like the silly eyepiece filters you get with some scopes) you are focussing all the light (and heat) before you filter it and so everything gets that much hotter (and brittle and more likely to break and more likely to cause irreparable eye damage).

Sorry if this sounds a little OTT, but it is REALLY IMPORTANT :)

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Absolutely the front.

Think of it this way: you filter the light (and heat) BEFORE you start focussing it onto a point.

If you do it the other way round (like the silly eyepiece filters you get with some scopes) you are focussing all the light (and heat) before you filter it and so everything gets that much hotter (and brittle and more likely to break and more likely to cause irreparable eye damage).

Sorry if this sounds a little OTT, but it is REALLY IMPORTANT :)

no ott at all very important to get it right thankyou for your help.

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