Jump to content

740427863_Terminatorchallenge.jpg.2f4cb93182b2ce715fac5aa75b0503c8.jpg

m57 and some nebula questions


4lefts
 Share

Recommended Posts

so i got my first views of the ring nebula last night through my 8" skywatcher newtonian.

anyway, it looked like a little jellyfish, very pale smoky grey in the centre, with a thin, bright, luminous edge. looked nice at 75x. i found it hard though to know if i was seeing it the best it could be - it was a difficult object to focus on, and i'm still not sure i've nailed the collimation thing to be honest. there's a white dwarf at the centre right? i'm guess there's no way i should be able to see that?

after this, i tried to find the north america nebula and the veil nebula, but no luck. to be honest, i'm not sure what i'm looking for there - are they big like m42 but much fainter? or really small? am i better waiting a month or so until they're better placed in the sky? (they sky was pretty dark - i could see the milky way fairly well.) would i do well to get a filter of some kind? i read astro baby's write up about the UHC/O-III, but i'm still not sure how much my mileage would vary.

cheers,

stephen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never been able to see the NA Nebula either if that's any consolation - I'm told it's so big and diffuse that large binoculars under coal black skies are the best way to see it.

I believe the central star of the Ring nebula is around 14th magnitude - I've managed around mag 13 with my 10" so I think an 8" would struggle with that.

M42 is by far the most spectacular nebula IMHO - nothing really comes close. The Veil Nebula complex in Cygnus is well worth a look though - you need very low power (it's nearly 4 degrees across all it's elements) and a UHC or an O-III filter will help a lot.

Two other good planetaries (the Veil is actually a supernova remnant) are the Owl Nebula in Ursa Major - again a UHC or O-III filter will help a lot with this one, and one of my favourites, the Dumbell Nebula in Vulpecula, not too far from the Ring Nebula. The Dumbell looks great in any scope from 4" upwards and does not need a filter IMHO.

Edited by John
Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks for the tips - the owl was on my list on friday night, but it clouded up about 12:30 so i decided to pack up. maybe i should have hung around, it would probably have blown over. i do really like planetaries - i find the idea of what you're looking at quite mind-blowing.

i'll start saving for one of the two filters (wow - 2" filters are on the pricy side!).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...wow - 2" filters are on the pricey side!.

Yes, but when you use 2" eyepieces you have to have filters to match !.

I only use one filter on nebulae, a 2" Astronomik O-III. It was expensive but I find it's an excellent "one filter solution". Where possible though I prefer to observe without a filter.

The Owl nebula can be tough to spot without a filter. The Dumbell is much easier to find.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks. i'm getting in to 2" eps in a big way. i love the big views. i also hate having to change the adaptor tube for the focuser between 1.25" and 2". so i was thinking about a hyperion zoom which has a 2" barrel. so, yeah, i think i may just need to bite the bullet.

i laminated a set of telrad finder charts for the messiers, and they really helped finding things like the ring nebula and m51. i'll see how i go with the owl.

completely off topic - i saw in your sig you have a kendrick solar filter. how is it? i ask because i was thinking of getting one, with a view to maybe taking the scope to school (i'm a teacher) to use with the kids one day, so i'd like something "proper". i wouldn't like to roll up with something i've made myself from cardboard. how durable are they? i think the words "baader solar film" conjures images up something that's quite easy to tear? or is this not the case?

Edited by 4lefts
Link to comment
Share on other sites

completely off topic - i saw in your sig you have a kendrick solar filter. how is it? i ask because i was thinking of getting one, with a view to maybe taking the scope to school (i'm a teacher) to use with the kids one day, so i'd like something "proper". i wouldn't like roll up with something i've made myself from cardboard. how durable are they? i think the words "baader solar film" conjures images up something that's quite easy to tear? or is this not the case?

I've only used the Kendrick filter a few times but it seems well made the Baader film delivers very nice white light solar views. Fortunately it fits both my Vixen 4" ED refractor and my Celestron C5 SCT so I have a choice of viewing tools :p

I believe the film is reasonably duarable but you would not want to get any sharp objects near it of course :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use the Sky Atlas 2000.0 Companion, 2nd Edition: Descriptions and Data for All 2,700 Star Clusters, Nebulae, and Galaxies Shown in Sky Atlas 2000.0, 2nd Edit. It describes what things actually look like!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the film is reasonably duarable but you would not want to get any sharp objects near it of course :D

Thanks. One of the many reasons we don't run with scissors ;).

@kharga - I'll look into a decent atlas. i have the cambridge double star atlas, which also shows a lot of DSOs as well. dunno why i didn't think to use it.:p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding the North America Nebula: I got it in Dienville, France, under dark skies with 15x70 binoculars. You really need something like a 3 to 4 deg FOV to appreciate the massive nebula. It is an astonishing sight once you get it, and once you get it, you wonder how you ever missed it. Light pollution is a real problem but for this object, so the same bins do not show it clearly at all when in my back garden. This summer I hope to get a better look (from southern France) with my 80mm APO. I have a quite affordable 2" APM UHC filter I use with that, which has helped with the Rosette Nebula.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you've described the view of the Ring Nebula very well :D

After seeing so many fantastic images of the Veil Nebula I bought a 1.25" OIII filter, last year I think it was. One thing with the OIII was that I was initially surprised just how dark the view was, and the Veil didn't 'jump out' for me as some descriptions on SGL had lead me to believe. Once I had tuned my eye so to speak, it was fine :p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had the 20 inch on the Veil last night with a Nagler 26. Without the filter it was quite subtle. With it, it was downright bright, with the Witch's Broom splitting into three nicely and all the photographically familiar bits of the Network Nebula clear, along with Pickering's Triangular Wisp. This was with a cheap Baader 2 inch O111. The same filter and EP shows the entire complex in the field of the 70mm Pronto.

Michael, I will try the Pronto on the NAN because I have never seen it in anything, despite trying. If you are in our part of France please call in!

Olly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had the 20 inch on the Veil last night with a Nagler 26. Without the filter it was quite subtle. With it, it was downright bright, with the Witch's Broom splitting into three nicely and all the photographically familiar bits of the Network Nebula clear, along with Pickering's Triangular Wisp. This was with a cheap Baader 2 inch O111. The same filter and EP shows the entire complex in the field of the 70mm Pronto.

Michael, I will try the Pronto on the NAN because I have never seen it in anything, despite trying. If you are in our part of France please call in!

Olly

Actually, I was thinking of going to your neck of the woods coming summer. If I do, you can be sure I will drop in. The NAN was evident without any filters.

Cheers

Michael

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.