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6" Newt to 10" or 12" Dob ???????


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Hi All,

Speaking hypothetically (in case my wife sees this), if I was going to upgrade my telescope, should i go from a 6" to a 10" or a 12" ? If i went to 10", would the change in light grasp be really noticeable? Or should i go for the 12"? I'm guessing after that, I'd need a new garage.....:p

By the way, love, I'm only dreaming (again, in case my lovely wife is looking here).:D

Bart

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I am in the process of going from 6" to 10". I chose 10" because that is as big as I can manage on my own and fit in the car. I also have fairly light polluted sky and I wouldn't get much benefit from an extra 2". If I could take it to a dark sight then I would go for 12", but since I can't, I sticking with 10". Even an 8" is a noticeable step up from 6" once your eyes are accustomed to what you are seeing. If you haven't had the 6" for very long then you may not notice much of a change because you haven't got used to what the objects 'should' look like in your 6" yet.

Does that make sense???

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Hi

Hypothetically speaking.:D Either the 10" or the 12" is a large jump in light grasp, and would be a great upgrade.

I have a 10" as my second scope and it's a great size.

Just make sure you check em out in the flesh, before you order, they're pretty bulky in the bigger sizes.

Regards Steve

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I used to have a 6" and the 10" is a good step up. The 12" wasn't practical for me unless I could have got a flextube, which funds wouldn't permit. The 10" is great though.

That's exactly what I was trying to say but couldn't remember the words. :D

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thanks all for replies to my, ahem, hypothetical question . I'm guessing your advice to 'use up' the 6" before embarking on an upgrade is good advice. Can't help being greedy though!

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I agree totally with the see before you buy mentality but my views when choosing were and now are as follows:

  • unless you may want to go down the photography route buy as big a scope as you can handle and use regularly
  • a jump of 4" in aperture will give a very noticeable leap in light gathering generally
  • don't worry about light pollution as larger scopes see more than smaller scopes no matter what the light pollution levels
  • if I had gone for the 10" scope, I'd have always wondered what the 12" was like
  • it's good to have two (or more) different scopes - one small and more manageable and the other large and impressive
  • I wanted a good planetary scope and bought a 6" f11 dob
  • I also wanted a 'light bucket' and bought a 12" dob - now upgraded to a 16" dob (about as large as I want to handle for the time being).
  • I will also probably eventually buy a small good quality wide field refractor (e.g. Megrez 72) as a holiday scope or for when I just feel like a wide field zoom around the Milky Way etc.
  • so called 'light buckets' give unbelievable planetary and lunar views in decent seeing
  • a 12" dob can fit into a standard hatchback with the back seats down - I can get my 16" solid tube f4 dob in the back of my Rover 214.

In your position, and assuming you may eventually want to go for a 12" scope, I'd either go for an 8" scope now or a 12". This will then provide a good leap either to 12" or 14" in the future. This, like eyepieces, is a good way to build up the aperture / quality of your gear.

Due to the compactness and quality of the bases and the light tubes, I prefer Orion Optics UK dobs but tend to buy them used.

Good luck with your choice and enjoy it whatever you go for.

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thanks all for comments, just hate the feeling i could be looking at the same object, but seeing a lot more!

Bart

You'll still have that feeling whatever scope you have.

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Go for the biggest aperture you can with quality optics, the scope should also be a manageable size and weight. I'm not on commission but can recommend Orion Optics in Crewe, because they have amazing optics and because their tubes are thin sheet steel they're quite light.

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As others have said, you will notice a big difference whether you go from a 6" to a 10" or 12". But once you get aperture fever, you don't recover. I went from an 8" SCT to a 12" Flextube - what a difference!. I then upgraded the 12" to a 14" FT GoTO - only a small difference, but still noticable - the GoTo is very handy to.

As for worrying about your wife's response - tell her it is better value for money when you buy bigger, as the price rise isn't exponential ... so you will keep this one longer and get better use. She might just go for that : )

Tom

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If you haven't done so yet, visit the local astro club. Likely you can see all of these scopes in person and have a go at the eyepiece.

As others have said, a 10 or 12" is a BIG jump is size and effort to set up. Of course, one view at the eyepiece of a big scope will really hook you!

Dan

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Go for the biggest aperture you can with quality optics, the scope should also be a manageable size and weight. I'm not on commission but can recommend Orion Optics in Crewe, because they have amazing optics and because their tubes are thin sheet steel they're quite light.

There's a lot of discussion around as to who does and who doesn't make quality optics.

Have a look at

http://stargazerslounge.com/equipment-reviews/84376-revelation-12-dobsonian-4.html

posts 91 and 93 before deciding how much to spend!

For a solid 12" f5 though, measure very carefully!

Edited by derekm
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Hi Bart,

There is plenty of good advice being given in this thread.

I have a 10" Orion Optics (UK) Dob at f6.3 with a 1/10 wave mirror. It just fits inside a Volvo S40 with the back seat down. Portability and transportability are very important issues unless you live in a light pollution free area and can use it from your property.

I can at my age manage to lift it and carry it short distances.

The OO Dob base is heavier than it looks.

Given the quality of the scope you will need to use top quality eyepieces to obtain the "Wow" factor. I use a Televue Nagler T6 7mm and the views are amazing.

The other issue is the F number. It is easier to focus a scope over f6 than an f4.8.

I spent a long time in deciding which scope to purchase, reading reviews in mags and on the Internet, spoke to a number of people, and finally reached the combinations that are right for me.

As the nights are getting lighter, it gives you time to make an informed decision.

A Star Party in September may be helpful, as you get the chance to see loads of different scopes, hear the owner's thoughts and of course view through the scopes. After that the skies get darker and your choice then becomes useful!!!!!

Incidentally, if you decide to purchase a new OO dob, there is usually a few weeks delay once the order is placed.

Trust the above is helpful.

Cheers

Adrian

Edited by Adrian Condon
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