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after having my first look at the moon... i realised it was much brighter than i thought it would be!!!

the brightness i can deal with though.... i was more wondering if the moon filter actually helps to bring any detail out? like craters and stuff! because you could only really see the craters well at the point where the light and dark side meet!! (but they did look stunning!)

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my moon filter (which conviently was from a previous astroboot item) seems to cut out the glare quite a bit

im baseing this on my 6"dob i find the filter seems to sharpen the moon a little showing the feutures more prominatly but it does give a little false colour around the edges blue and goldish (similar to a picture of the moon in the luna images section)

it may be my eyesight though as i am fortunate to be younger perhaps a more seasoned astro person will help as well :eek:

gaz

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hi will i have about 14 colored filters which all bring out diferent features on that speacail lunar surface,i also use a baader moon and sky glow neodymium filter which is great for most planets but excdels on the moon takes the glare away for take in pics with a dslr brill the a variable polarrizing filter may hepf bring subtle features out i~ll stick a link up for photo bucket were have took pics with a dslr and filters so you can see what they like cheers pat

Pictures by todd8137 - Photobucket

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Some great pics Todd. Thanks for putting them up.

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I'm not sure if my moon filter really helps with seeing any more detail, but it definitely prevents you from going blind. I couldn't do without mine.

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Hi, I got the Orion Variable Polarizer Moon filter, and it's one of the most useful items in my kit. You simply twist it and it filters between 1% and 40% of the light. This is quite useful as the Moon's glare is not constant, being far less during first quarter, say, than during a full Moon. (I also use it along with my solar filter as an additional glare reducer). Being polarized, it also does'nt tint your view with that sickly green hue. It's a liitle more expensive than a single filter, but I use it all the time so for me, a great investment.

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i use the orion 13% transmission nd96 moon filter very usefull especially as the moons phase gets larger.

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A #12 yellow filter is great for lunar (and cloud detail on Jupiter) :)

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Another vote for the Baader Neo filter. I got the 2" version recommended, now I don't have to keep screwing it in each eyepiece every time I want to change the magnification when looking at the moon.

Last night it seemed get rid of so much atmospheric turbulence too.

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I've got the Baader 1.25" Neodymium, I have to attach mine onto the EP each time; but you're right - great for moon and sky glow. I notice the difference :)

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The Moon is Earth's largest natural satellite and the nearest major celestial object. Observing the Moon can be accomplished by using a variety of instruments ranging from the naked eye to large telescopes. For most people, the Moon is the only celestial object upon which surface features can be discerned with the naked eye (some people with good eyesight can see large sunspots on the surface of the Sun using handheld solar filters). the Moon can be viewed even with the naked eye, however it may be more enjoyable with optical instruments. The primary lunar surface features detectable to the naked eye are the lunar maria or "seas", large basaltic plains which form the familiar "Man in the Moon" and other figures seen by many people who take a glance at a full moon. The maria cover about 35% of the surface.

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lats night i tried for the 1st time my baader moon&sky glow on the moon; i tried to compare, in my brain, the image with and without the filter..i am impressed with this filter, it really cuts down LP and glare.cant speak for DSO or other planets, but the challenge is on !

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