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Hi all,

Just a quick newbie question from a new Dob user.

I'm hoping to take my new scope to my aunt's next weekend. (Darker site). Just wondering how robust the scope is?? Lots of bumpy track/ dodgy roads on the way....how will the scope fare in the back of my fiesta? Will it knock the collimation out, because, as only having the scope a few weeks, ( the collimation looks fine to me at the mo..), the thought of having to re- collimate so soon scares the bejesus out of me!! (Also, don't have any collimating kit at the moment!)

Should I be 'padding/protecting' somehow??

Any advice greatly received.

Cheers,

Vicky.

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Personally, as long as the scope is secure on the back seat (seatbelt it?) and is therefore not likely to move around or bump into anything I'm sure you will be fine. I think most of us would be probably be horrified to see how the scopes in their original packaging are thrown around when in transit from the factory and then on to the retailer and of course then yourself - probably best that we don't know!

Of course at some point you will have to collimate your scope and I'm sure that deep down you are trying to put that moment off for as long as possible. It's not a difficult procedure and all you need is a good method and a little patience.

James

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I think most of us would be probably be horrified to see how the scopes in their original packaging are thrown around when in transit from the factory and then on to the retailer and of course then yourself - probably best that we don't know!

Of course at some point you will have to collimate your scope and I'm sure that deep down you are trying to put that moment off for as long as possible. It's not a difficult procedure and all you need is a good method and a little patience.

James

Thanks for the advice James, and a good point!! If the scope made it from China in one piece, 20 miles down the road should be a doddle I guess. ;)

And you are right of course....I 'am' trying to 'put it off'...but I guess I'll have to bite the bullet sometime....:o

Cheers,

Vicky.

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Vicky, just to reassure you regarding your collimation fears, have you checked out Astrobaby's guide on how its done.

Mel's instructions are really good but it won't change your driving!;)

James

p.s I'll see if I can find you a link

Edited by JamesM
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Vicky, Collimation worried me for a while too, but I overcame it by completely dissassembling my old 76mm McSeeFuzz telescope right down to individual nuts and screws.

Putting it back together a couple of times showed me how easy collimating can be. Fiddly, yes, but ultimately not complicated and a very useful skill.

If you have an old scope lying around, give it a go, its a good confidence boost to vastly improve a rubbish telescope.

Alan

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i use to take my dob to a dark site which had some very bumpy roads/tracks

...so no problems there then! Cheers!:D

Vicky, just to reassure you regarding your collimation fears, have you checked out Astrobaby's guide on how its done.

Mel's instructions are really good but it won't change your driving!;)

I have read Astrobaby's guide, and I think this is probably the guide I'll follow, but I'll have to get a Cheshire collimator first!

As to the driving.......you been talking to my husband???:o

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Ive taken my newt to Devon a few times without too much hassle

just either secure with the belt as James suggested, or i wrapped mine in a travel blanket and packed it ON TOP of a couple of bags were were also taking. The bags should help; dampen some of the bumping about if you have to put it in the boot.

(my wife insisted the kids were in the back seat and not my scope....pity, the trips would have been quieter the other way around !!)

;):evil4::o

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Hi Vicky

Collimating a Newtonian is like riding a bike; harder to explain than do.;)

It's one of those "Oh is that all there is to it" things.

I collimate my Dobs every time I observe ( I always transport to my observing sites ) it takes no time at all to do and is very easy.

Also The more you do it the quicker and easier it is.

That said newtonians under 10" have light enough mirrors that don't jump out of line much unless they get a bit of a knock.

Regards Steve

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Vicky, Collimation worried me for a while too, but I overcame it by completely dissassembling my old 76mm McSeeFuzz telescope right down to individual nuts and screws.

Alan

;):eek::o. Love your style Alan, but I can't even put my cheesegrater back together after washing it!!!;)

(my wife insisted the kids were in the back seat and not my scope....pity, the trips would have been quieter the other way around !!)

:D:):o:)

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I drive down a bumpy lane to my local dark site. I pop it on a blanket on the back seat and fix the belts round it - never a problem. I re-collimate every two or three sessions which ain't bad for a sliding truss dob ;)

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I drive down a bumpy lane to my local dark site. I pop it on a blanket on the back seat and fix the belts round it - never a problem.

Well, by general consensus, looks like belts and blankets it is then!;)

Can't wait to get to a dark site now!!

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