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Filter all rounder?


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Happily my front garden faces south,so currently I can swing from the Moon to Saturn with ease-except my Celestron moon filter has to be removed/replaced each time. Is there a versatile filter that I can leave in,to save the possibility of dropping my luscious Hyperion during the troublesome filter change?

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I'm just wondering why you are using a moon filter to start with? Sure, it combats the immediate glare when your eye first addresses the eyepiece but with out one I find my eye quickly adjusts to the brightness and I welcome the amount of detail that this bright light provides (especially across the terminator). There are some who find the brightness pretty uncomfortable and apologies if this is something that you experience. I was just curious as to why you use this filter and whether this is something you feel you 'ought' to use?

One last point and that is when I observe the moon, I tend to observe it as one of the last objects on my viewing list because with any filter, it is still pretty bright and will naturally affect my viewing of other objects. I understand where you're coming from with your question as I do this with my camera lenses in case I drop them. Baader make a light pollution filter which can help improve contrast and bring out detail on planets and I suppose like any filter, would have help reduce brightness on an object of the moon. The Baader one is not the cheapest but has a coating that allows you to clean it without fear of damaging the coating.

Hope that helps.

James

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I find the moon quite painful in my Hyperion,and have to restrict viewing to the terminator.i've seen the Baader mentioned elsewhere,and hoped someone might have experience of it.What I don't need is a filter wheel with more little things to drop in the dark!

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Dave, I have the Baader filter and would say that 'if' there was such a thing as a general filter that could remain attached to the eyepiece, this would be one of them. In my case I have the 2" version which I have secured in the diagonal and so avoid the need to change it for each eyepiece. They aren't the cheapest but the coatings seem to me to make a difference that's worth having.

James

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your problem will be that with a filter in place it will darken saturn to the same degree that it darkens the moon, a 50% decrease in light coming off the moon can be necessary...i cant see anyone arguing for a 50% light reduction from a planet?

i'd still go with the wheel, you screw the filters in, they wont fall out, you view the moon turn it to moon filter, switch back to saturn turn it to a blank opening.

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This is what I mean about not understanding the physics;I am led to believe it is not simply a matter of"darkening" but filtering in a particular way;polarisers on a photo lens for instance change the image in contast terms as opposed to darkening it. I like the wheel idea,but I still need to understand the filters first. The Baader filter,incidentally,is supposed to enhance views of Saturn and Jupiter.

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You might look into getting a variable polarisation filter.

This will give you an adjustable degree of of light reduction.

You can leave it in place all the time. When viewing the moon reduce the light accordingly, set back to full brightness for everything else.

Regards

Barry

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I'm not convinced that filters are essential at all for nighttime astro viewing to be honest. My scopes go from 4" to 10" and the only filter I use is an O-III to enhance the contrast of certain nebulae. Other than that, all my observing is done filter free.

We stuggle to get enough light with nighttime astronomy most of the time (hence the obsession with aperture !) so I prefer not to filter out photons that have actually made it into my scope unless there is a real advantage to doing so :eek:

Edited by John
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That element of enhancement does rather suggest that there is more to filter use than obstructing light,doesn't it-looking at the sun with one allows the sighting of phenomena unavailable otherwise- but I do agree with you that generally let the aperture speak.

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