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Camera for full disc


A McEwan
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Hi all,

Just wondering what cameras you folks are using to capture full disc shots using Lunt LS60 H-a scopes? Any commens re the different types (ease of use, performance, cost etc) woul be appreciated too.

Many thanks,

Ant

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Hi Ant

I have used both a Canon 400d and 60d DSLR's with T mount screwed directly onto the rear blocking filter

To do this you need to unsrew the lense holder from the blocking filter.

The canon 60d was the best result, as you can view the image with live view to obtain optinum focus.

I have also used a DMK41 with reducer to achieve a full disk but this does reduce the quality of the final image.

THe DMK41 without reducer does achieve aproximatly 7/8 the whole disk in exceptional quality.

I am still learning, so perhaps one of the more experience mebers could give you better advice.

regards

Ivor

Edited by mattifor
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  • 2 weeks later...

I use the DMK41 and my images aren't too shabby. A DMK51 has just been released that expands the sensor in the direction the current DMK41 chops the disk off at 85% (as mentioned). More costly than the existing DMK, but a load cheaper than the (I am sure very lovely) Skynyx! The supplied software is fine for setting the camera and acxquiring data, then off to registax/avistack... I use MS ICE to stitch the images, it's only failed on one especially bland prom image so far, so I don't mind shooting more images. I do sometimes use a 0.5x reducer and get a dinky across 50% of the sensor, however it speeds up the exposure time and makes imaging the faint proms easier (though at smaller image scale).

Do tell us what you choose, I recently purchased my pressure tuned Lunt60 on your good impression, wonder if you'll end up with a big DMK on mine?!

Cheers

PEterW

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That might be possible, Peter! I'll let you know. Thanks for the info.

But... off at a tangent here...

Presumably it's the focal length of the scope that limits the area that the chip can capture? The shorter, the wider the field? Presumably someone could equip a 400mm focal length Skywatcher 80mm (f5) with a front-mounted H-a filter and a focuser mounted blocking filter, and this would enable a larger percentage of the disc to be captured? Or am I way off base here, and the camera actually has to have a bigger area?

Sadly a Skynyx is well beyond my reach at the moment, especially considering my inexperience at this point.

Thanks,

Ant

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Helen uses a front filter on a ZS66 (from memory) and can fit the full disc onto a DMK41, something that I might have thought about before going for the LS60. However, I think it's a great telescope.

Despite my long list of large DSO mosaics I'm blowed if I can get multi panel mosaics to work on the sun. However, two would not be a problem if that's what you need with a DMK41 with the Lunt 60.

Must look into this DMK51 though.

Olly

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Stitching disk images i use MS ICE, worked so far, granted I would be stuck if it decided it couldn't stitch them, as I found with the odd prom image. Dmk41 and lunt60 is fine. Now the dmk72.....ooooeeeee have to look into that. I sort of wanted one of their soon to be released extra sensitive small camera for proms.

Cheers

PEterW

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Now the dmk72.....ooooeeeee have to look into that. I sort of wanted one of their soon to be released extra sensitive small camera for proms.

There is a lot of options. That DMK72 seems to have most pixels of them all (moon 1, and moon 2 images). However some solar images tend to choose 12-bit cameras over 8-bit for this (on cloudynights). Cheapest (and very good) lunar-solar camera of this type is/should be PGR Chameleon - ( http://www.davidcortner.com/slowblog/20100822.php ) - but hard to get in EU (they do have a shop in Germany now somewhere).

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