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Imagers are not Astronomers or are they.


astro mick
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I don't do imaging and for me, nothing beats the thrill of seeing objects with my own eyes. But having seen some of the wonderful images produced on this forum, it's not hard to see the attraction, and I have plenty of respect for the skill and perseverance shown by those who image.

And I also believe than anyone who observes the night sky is an astronomer - whether it's through an EP, computer monitor, bins, or naked eye; whether they're professionals, amateurs or hobbyists...

Mick, If you feel that you're missing out on the bigger picture, then perhaps that little voice of doubt means it's time for a break, or prehaps get yourself another, visual-only setup and do both ?

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Its all astronomy.

Naked eye, bino's, Telescopes, Imaging, Solar, Spectrography.

Its about which one the individual choose to do the most.

And the beauty is you can change to fit when ever you want (funds according) to have a dabble at all the different types.

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I agree its all astronomy.

However I found myself sitting in front of a pc screen watching the PHD graph for hours and I was missing the clear skies which we have too little of.

So now whilst the imaging rig is on auto Im outside the observatory with one of my other scopes observing. Now if the image doesnt turn out the clear night has not been lost

Philj

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Oh what a can of worms!

I have never looked through any of my telescopes with my own eyeball. I had the intention of imaging from the outset.

I can see the procession of torches coming up the road! Looks like we got ourselves an old fashioned lynching! :D

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Hi.

Perhaps this may be a good time to close the thread,i dont know.I really appreciate the views of all you guys,your a great bunch.

We are a patient lot,we wait for clear skies we over come equipment difficulties,we brave adverse conditions,and yet we still are all driven by the love of the stars.

So i salute all you totally mad,insane,and completely bonkers fellow ASTRONOMERS.(lol).

Mick.

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Have to say that looking at fuzzies through even huge dobs in dark sites doesnt really do anything for me, but find them nestled in amongst the pics that roll off the camera gives me a buzz every time.

To answer the original question, you first require an authoritative definition of what an "astronomer" is, then determine who can rightly wear the hat.

I'm happy to be a stargazer :D

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Imaging satisfies the technical side of me. I can get as much embedded software and electronics out of it as I want. After all, that's my job and hobby.

But, whilst the automated subs are rolling in I still set up the other scope and observe for hours on end.

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Close the thread? I hope I haven't come across the wrong way or caused offense as it wasn't intended as I have a great respect for all aspects of astronomy. What I was trying to say was that if your interested in astronomy then just because you enjoy or specialise in imaging it doesn't mean your any less of an astronomer. like if your a wildlife expert.. Taking pictures of elephants doesn't mean your simply a 'photographer' and no longer a wildlife expert. I was actually trying

To support the idea that were all astronomers whatever area makes us happy.

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It works the other way round too. If a world class photographer who takes a single picture of the moon does that makes them an astronomer? Maybe it does maybe it doesn't. I personally Think it's down to the passion of the individual and what motivates them and there is no reason why you can't be an astrophotographer which is the best of both worlds if you have the time and money. I agree with the above as someone said 'find what makes you happy and stick with it'

I'm just not sure everything/everyone needs a specific label. After all... Were all 'starstuff'

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I've had bad nights, things not going right, hours sorting out kit looking at a computer screen and suddenly thought, 'What am I doing?' .... Binned the lot and popped outside with the star chart.

I think the message for us all is....'Don't forget to look up and remember why you started in the first place'

The heaven's are truly amazing! Makes you realise, on the grand scale of things, just how insignificant all of life's problems really are.

Clear Skies!

Mark

Edited by Specman
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I've been reading this great site regarding the history of the telescope.

Telescopes from the Ground Up

I've posted up the section from the early-mid 1900's and the great 200" telescope. It talks about imaging on page 3 and I think they were very much into the fact that the camera reveals more information than the eye.

Era: Huge Reflectors

For astronomers the invention of the camera and it's development was all part of the process to help further their science. I think the same applies today.

Alan

Edited by blackparticle
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i still get a buzz looking at up and wondering if someone somewhere in there is staring back at a fellow fuzzy galaxy and thinking the exact same thing!

i wouldnt call or label myself as an astronomer...i like TJ prefer stargazer :D but i have to say since hubbles amazing shots i think the old fuzzy specs are always gonna be looked on a 'boring' to some but thrilling to others.

'' Technology is a way of organizing the universe so that man dosnt have to experience it '' Max Frisch

Edited by Axe
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I may or may not have to apologise for bumping this thread, but I've gone and done it now anyway! ;)

I just wanted to say that, in part because of this thread, Monday night was nice and clear so I got the scope out, left the camera strictly *inside* and spent the night observing. It's been too long and very enjoyable it was too. I spent probably an hour staring at Saturn at 150x, then went galaxy hunting and got some good views of M51 and M63.

As I said, very enjoyable. But because my equipment is all geared towards imaging it was a bit painful at first, for a few reasons!...

  1. I *have* to connect to my laptop to enable tracking. (I don't have a handset!)
  2. I didn't extend the tripod legs enough, so I almost broke my back looking through the finder scope
  3. It's friggin' heavy!

What I really need is a grab-n-go to use while imaging.

Any other imagers rekindled their observing pleasure recently?

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Does it really matter what you or anyone else calls you, we all get our enjoyment in different ways.

We should all be greatful that we live at a time when there is such an amazing variety of equipment available.

Just do want you want and enjoy doing it and respect the skills of those with different priorities.

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Any other imagers rekindled their observing pleasure recently?

Only last week I done a few hours imaging but the wind picked up and I was getting more bad subs than good.

As it was still a clear night and I have been concentrating on imaging/and bad weather for a few months, I decided to have a look round and find some Messier objects. I only started last September so I hadn't seen a lot of the constellations.

Anyway it turned out to be an amazing nights observing I managed to tick off another 27 messiers most of which were open and globular clusters in Sagittarious and Ophiucus. I have to admit I loved every minute of it and finally packed up at 4am.

Because of work and it not getting dark until late I have only been getting the scope out on weekends but after last weeks observing if I get a clear night during the week then I know I can get the scope out, quick polar align and do some observing for an hour.

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Hi all

So if I get the original drift of this thread, and some of the answers, Profesional Asronomers are not Astronomers at all just people who look at images on a computer screen, as all the scopes that "Profesionals" use are automated the obviouse one is Hubble, In my humble opinion the definition of a Astronomer is a person who studys the night sky by what ever means they choose or are able to use.

Edited by thommo10
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If you image through a telescope then surely you have every right to call yourself an astronomer. People need to remember that a lot of people got their interest in astronomy because they have seen the images that can be captured from your backgarden.

I bet the majority of astro imagers started off as visual observers, connecting a camera is just natural progression.

sent from my android using Tapatalk

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I think this is dead easy. If imaging is driving you away from what is out there, stop doing it. For me the reverse is the case and I watch other imagers here lovingly teasing out a bit of three dimensionality, some sparkle from the hot supergiants, some choking dust, and I know I'm not alone. But if that is not what it is doing for you, then ditch it.

I had the same thing teaching English Lit. If criticsm does not enhance your enjoyment of literature, don't do it. Change to another subject. Moi, I love talking about books and films and analysing them. It makes them live - for me.

We are not all the same. For me imaging and watching telly are about as alike as eating chocolate and playing the violin (though I do neither!!)

Olly

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